search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Benchmark


2018 THE GARDEN MARKET SUPPLEMENT SALES GROWTH: BLUE DIAMOND LEADS THE FIELD % sales growth


1. Blue Diamond 2. Bents


3. Scotsdale


4. Woodcote Green Millbrook Squires


5. 6. 7.


Whitehall


8. Gordale 9. Klondyke 10. Hillier


11. Haskins 12. Notcutts 13. Wyevale 14. Webbs


15. Chessington 16. Stewarts 17. Garsons 18. Hayes


19. Van Hage 20. Dobbies 21. Aylett 22. Polhill


23. Barton Grange 24. Coolings 25. Planters 26. Frosts Average


5-year Latest


average year 10.5


-1 year -2 year -3 year 5.7 10.3 17.8 12.5


9.5 8.2 22.6 7.1 8.2 9.1


8.1 6.5 10.5 8.9 5.6 3.1 9.5 8.6 5.4 6.2 1.1 6.0


7.2 2.0 11.1 22.7 17.4 19.1 10.7


5.1 7.3 12.5 9.4 2.8 5.0


5.0 11.4 1.8 2.8


4.8 7.9 7.8 4.5 7.0 4.5 4.5


(0.4) 7.5 10.8 5.3 6.4 14.0 3.9


4.3 4.6 7.1 5.1 6.5 4.2 3.0 3.9 6.5 7.8 3.9


3.8 6.0 4.3 7.2 5.2 3.2 12.1 3.7 3.2


0.1


2.8 (5.1) 2.8 2.4


(0.3) (3.2) (0.8) (3.4) (2.1) (4.3) (8.8)


5.2 3.1 2.1


5.3 5.9


(0.7) 2.8 10.6 12.6 1.8


3.1 -4


year 6.2


1.2 2.7


(3.0)


(12.2) 3.2


(6.4) (0.5) 6.7


(3.1) 1.8


(2.6) 3.0 10.1 7.2 11.5


7.0 3.8 12.6 (3.9) 1.6


(1.8) 0.5 10.9 3.3 2.8


(0.7) 2.8 4.0


(2.7)


1.0 2.8


5.6 (12.5) (14.3) (17.2) (32.6) (9.5)


6.0 0.3 1.4 7.6 0.8 1.7


3.5 3.9 2.9 5.1 7.4


Source: DIY Week analysis of fi led company accounts 6 DIY WEEK GARDEN MARKET SUPPLEMENT


(7.3) (1.7) 0.1 1.9


(3.4)


(11.3) (3.5) 6.1 0.8 1.2


(3.6) (2.2)


(16.4) 6.0


(5.5) (1.6)


I


nterestingly, the two companies at the head of this chart have arrived at a very similar average growth rate through entirely diff erent policies.


Blue Diamond is one of the industry’s most acquisitive chains, and has steadily added to its portfolio of garden centres; the recent acquisition of nine former Wyevale centres brought its total to 24 (although this stage in its expansion has yet to be refl ected in fi led accounts). Bents, by contrast, remains a single- centre operation – but has continuously invested in expanding its range of products and services. Third-place Scotsdale’s average growth rate was boosted by its acquisition in 1913 of the Horningsea site; fourth-placed Woodcote Green is a single centre, and fi fth-placed Millbrook is a small chain. In other words, there’s no clear pattern. The underlying message, however, is that at time when retailing generally is under pressure, garden centre retailing remains very healthy. Looking at average sales growth rates over the past fi ve years, 21 out of the 26 companies listed generated real growth; and we have to go back fi ve years before fi nding a year in which a signifi cant proportion (14 out of 26) failed to record sales growth. Against that, the chart shows clearly that average sales growth across the industry has been declining steadily: after bouncing back from an average decline of 1.6% fi ve years ago to strong average growth of 7.4% a year later, the annual average gain has slipped since then, down to 3.9% in the latest year. Nevertheless, it’s all growth, and there


are other retail sectors where an average 3.5% annual sales growth rate would be very welcome. Garden centre operators have long known that their industry is highly risk-exposed in terms of weather. But considered in the context of the ‘new’ risk – online competition – garden centres are comparatively well protected. They off er a combination of pleasurable browsing, gardening expertise, impulse spending opportunities and self- indulgent catering which is impossible to replicate online; they are the masters of leisure retailing.


www.diyweek.net


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60