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lotteries and systems for Totalizator to run until 2018.


Totalizator has now announced that it plans to open 50 gaming halls with low prize slots by the end of this year and will be partnering Polish companies - Exatel, Polish Security Printing Works and Military Communications Works – who will be responsible for the preparation and delivery of the machines.


Te aim is to introduce a total of 35,000 machines into the market in the next two to three years. It seems the Polish companies developing the machines will develop the software and main components and buy in the game. Te company plans to launch a prototype in late May or early June and after three to four months machines should be ready for mass production.


At the moment it is said the Polish market loses around PLN552m annually in gambling losses. According to sources in 2015 there were some 29,000 slots operating without permits in Poland.


Te new slot hall market is expected to see repercussions for the casino market which is quite robust in Poland. Tere are currently a total of 45 casinos open at present (2017). Te number of games in casinos and slots halls in 2015 was 146 cylindrical games, 218 card games, 2,271 slots in casinos.


Since the 2009 Gaming Act slots were only permitted in casinos and there are now


Marta Kostka, President, Association of Bookmakers and Bookmakers’ Employees


How will the new amendments affect the sports betting sector? “Te Association of Bookmakers and Bookmakers’ Employees (SPiPFB) has been closely following the changes underway in the Gambling Act. Te amendment in question is particularly important considering the amount of losses incurred yearly by the Treasury due to illegal gambling offered online in Poland (with yearly turnover at around PLN6bn).


Te conditions created by the existing law have been extremely favourable to those bookmakers who conduct their operation in a legal manner. Tis led to a situation where as much as 90 per cent of the online market


View from the bookmakers


share belongs to entities that operate in Poland without proper permits, fail to observe Polish laws and do not pay national taxes. Such entities are unfair competition for legally operating companies that pay their taxes, employ thousands of people and sponsor Polish sports.


Te Association believes that the amendment may lead to fairer competition on the Polish bookmaking market and may prove an efficient tool in reducing the many issues that plague the Polish betting industry. In addition the aforementioned changes may also bring improved social protection against illegal gambling. For this to be effective however, competent authorities must vigorously enforce the act. Demonstrating resolve in the proper enforcement of the new law is particularly important considering the news suggesting that blocking illegal operators’ website and payments in line with the amendment, may prove ineffective.


What is more, further changes in law should be considered and applied. Te Association has long been appealing for the tax modification in Poland. Rationalisation of tax rates and changing the tax base seem to be suitable both for the sector and state. We are convinced that GGR tax is one of the most efficient options.”


NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / 247.COM P81


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