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Page 62


www.us- tech.com


March, 2021


Collaborating with an Expert Integrator...


Continued from page 60


scratch in order to fit together all the pieces of the puzzle.” In the case of RDS, the company typi- cally uses standardized off-the- shelf solutions and integrates it with other systems, but can design and manufacture equip- ment and subsystems from scratch, as needed. This includes such equip-


ment as automated assembly solutions, inspection systems, packaging equipment,


label-


ing/marking systems and pal- letizing automation, as well as


filling systems, and machine tending automation.


Pharmaceutical Handling As an example, after trouble


with an initial vendor, this approach helped Monsanto Dairy Group stay on schedule with the construction and start up of a veterinary pharmaceutical facili- ty in Augusta, Georgia, accord- ing to Chris R. Redford, P.E., principal pharmaceutical engi- neer, Monsanto AG Engineering. “The original custom han-


dling system purchased during construction was found unac- ceptable after a full year of design and fabrication effort. This put us in a very difficult position. We either had to accept a poor-quality piece of equip- ment and modify it to meet our requirements, or accept a lengthy schedule delay,” says Redford. In response, Redford turned


to RDS, and credits the compa- ny’s effort in getting the facility rollout back on track. According to Redford, in working with RDS, “We were able to design a new handling system from scratch in just a few weeks. RDS designed the new system in mod- ular sections that could be brought into the facility through standard door openings. This allowed us to continue facility construction with no delay.”


RF Module Assembly Despite the complexities of


manufacturing automation, due to market requirements even very technical systems often have to be developed and put into production under com- pressed time schedules. Such was the case when wireless com- munications manufacturer Tri - ton Network Systems created a high-volume manufacturing line for the assembly of high-frequen- cy, RF modules used in the broadband wireless industry, according to Joseph Kreuz - paintner, principal engineer at Triton Network Systems. Kreuzpaintner says that the


manufacturing requirements involved precision alignment and mounting of odd-shaped components, dispensing of epoxy, electrical testing of prod- uct on laser equipment, inline processing of modules at a heat- ed test station, installation of cables, and mechanical assembly of a circuit board to a housing. He notes that after conduct-


ing a survey of integration com- panies meeting Triton’s manu- facturing work cell require- ments, RDS was selected as the primary equipment integrator for the module factory at Triton, which helped to expedite project Continued on next page


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