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Page 22


www.us-tech.com NovaCentrix Delivers the Latest


pertise that enables the development and production of next-generation printed elec- tronic devices. The NovaCentrix team develops, patents


Soldering for Flexible Printed Electronics H


By Deb Dalton, Marketing and Events Manager, NovaCentrix


eadquartered in Austin, Texas, Nova- Centrix offers photonic curing tools, conductive inks, materials, and ex-


ing of samples and pilot rolls with the assis- tance of its team of process engineers.


Photonic Curing of Thin Films NovaCentrix invented photonic curing,


and commercializes new technologies in printed electronics, nanoparticle manufac- turing, pulsed power equipment, and related fields. Its science and engineering team has decades of cumulative experience, and it con- tinuously strives to create class-lead- ing technologies, such as PulseForge® tools and Metalon® inks. “We work to enable every cus-


tomer to succeed in their efforts,” says Stan Farnsworth, chief marketing of- ficer. “If we can add products or capa- bilities or make improvements for our customers’ benefit, we will do it.” According to Charles Munson,


NovaCentrix’ CEO, innovation contin- ues with frequent product enhance- ments, upgrades and accessories across all of the company’s products. Its well-equipped print-and-cure lab has flex, screen, inkjet, spray, and other ink deposition technologies for client use. NovaCentrix welcomes process-


which is the high-temperature thermal pro- cessing of a thin film using pulsed light from a flashlamp. When this transient processing is done on a low-temperature substrate such as plastic, paper or glass, it is possible to reach a significantly higher temperature than the substrate ordinarily can withstand


under an equilibrium heating source such as an oven. “Our team has pioneered a new genre in


high-speed, high-temp materials processing, which now enables a myriad of consumer de- vices,” said Farnsworth. The company’s latest development, the


PulseForge soldering toolset, was the result of a technology partnership with the Holst Cen- ter. It enables soldering onto temperature- sensitive substrates, such as PET, paper and PEN, TPU, and fabric, using standard SMT components and lead-free solder pastes. The system solders in seconds. NovaCentrix’s patented pulses of


high-intensity light are used in place of conventional soldering and laser meth- ods. Solder is heated to its liquidus temperature in milliseconds — without damaging the underlying substrate. And with the lamps’ large coverage area, multiple LEDs, for example, can be soldered simultaneously — unlike “one-at-a-time” laser options. This provides immediate cooling,


8:37 AM Page 1


NovaCentrix develops photonic curing, inks and materials to create flexible printed electronics.


which results in a stronger bond. The tools work with conventional lead- free solders and, with its process time in the milliseconds, substrates stay cool, combining the flexibility of sol-


Continued on next page


March, 2021


HOT-ROOM-COLD-TEMP TEST HANDLER


• Tests up to 3 different temperatures with one socket insertion. • -55°C to 155°C test capability (-80°C to 300°C optional). • +/- 2°C control standard (+/-0.1°C control optional).


• Temperatures set, monitored under software control.


• Large, removable test site dock fits wide range of testers/programmers.


• Can be made to fit nearly any device type with little to no changeover.


• Dino-Lite digital microscope allows for fast and easy calibration.


www.exatron.com 1-800-EXA-TRON 1-408-629-7600


See at IPC APEX (virtual)


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