search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Page 38


www.us-tech.com


March, 2021


Height for Wave Soldering ERLANGER, KY — Most wave soldering systems have one or two solder nozzles that generate


SEHO: Auto-Adjust Nozzle


ware to within 0.8 in. (20 mm) of the board.


Automatic nozzle height ad-


MWS 2340 wave soldering system.


a turbulent wave. This configu- ration is suitable for most prod- ucts, but it has limitations, such as soldering boards with masks. Depending on the thickness


of the masks and size of the cutouts, it is not easy to guaran- tee that every solder joint will be wetted reliably. Also, reproduc- ing the process can be difficult if the distance between covered SMT components and THT pins is very small. SEHO has developed auto-


matic nozzle height adjustment for wave soldering, providing an innovative solution for these ap- plications. The height of each nozzle can be adjusted by soft-


justment provides additional process stability, as all joints are reliably wetted and component- specific and defined solder peel- off is enabled. In the MWS series, the sys-


tem is linked to its sector-solder- ing feature. This function allows program parameters to be set for pump revolution speed (wave height) and conveyor speed for


up to 16 segments of a PCB. Contact: SEHO North Amer- ica, Inc., 1445 Jamike Avenue,


Suite 1, Erlanger, KY 41018 % 859-371-7346 E-mail: sehona@sehona.com Web: www.seho.de/en/north- america


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96