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Professional Services


Stop missing out on talented staff


By Deb Pettingill (pictured), founder and director at Proftech Talent


faster than anywhere else in England over the past 12 months, we have found that the talent pool of people looking for work remains a real headache for many HR departments. Not since 1975 has our unemployment rate been so


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low. Couple this with the start of 2019 year seeing the fastest pace of hiring in more than three years and you can clearly see a worsening candidate market. Yet with all of this as a backdrop and the lack of


suitably qualified candidates, employers are still holding out for the perfect candidate, who very often simply doesn’t exist. There are two things that employers can do to


reduce the chance of missing out on hiring talented people who will take their business forward: look at refreshing the recruitment processes to enable speed and flexibility, and look at the benefits of working for a company compared to its competitors i.e. its reputation for looking after and nurturing their staff.


Refresh the process Flexibility and efficiency are the key to successful hiring, so take a fresh look at your current recruitment processes and ensure they are still fit for purpose in a hugely competitive arena. Many employer recruitment processes I see are simply that – ‘processes’. They have been embedded into companies for many years and have gone unchanged and unchallenged.


ompanies in the Midlands are facing a recruitment crisis. While it’s true that employment in the West Midlands has grown


Companies need to have a rethink about the reality


of the talent pool out there and recalibrate their recruitment techniques and expectations. Reduce the timescales of the ‘process’ and be prepared to recruit a candidate having a great attitude, transferable skills and the potential to pick things up quickly. Be prepared to only have 70 per cent of the skills and experience on your wish list, and sometime even less! The right attitude, capability and drive often go a long way and are just as important as the skills that can be quickly obtained. Remember that a CV is only a small part of the


picture. While there is no doubt it’s a good starting point, I believe personality traits such as integrity, pride, determination, loyalty, conscientious and competitiveness are just as valuable as key skills or experience.


Look to your competitors In today’s market, candidates don’t want or need to jump through hoops to prove themselves. Previously used ‘initiation’ techniques to see how they potential recruits perform can turn off candidates and the emphasis is now very much on what you as an employer can offer that your competitors can’t. Talented people are in the minority so expect to


compete with other businesses. As brand reputation and company culture are becoming more and more important, it’s important to stand out from the crowd if you want to draw from the widest pool of candidates.


‘Flexibility and efficiency are the key to successful hiring, so take a fresh look at your current recruitment processes’


Feature


May 2019 CHAMBERLINK 69


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