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Sutton Coldfield Sutton Coldfield


Chamber of Commerce


Contact: Chris Brewerton T: 077534 53624


Sutton Coldfield Chamber Patrons


Charity of the Year


Mayor promises better rail services in Sutton


Sutton Coldfield rail users and businesses can look forward to better rail services with more rolling stock, improved frequency and the potential reopening of the Sutton Park line to passengers. That’s according to West Midlands mayor


Andy Street, who says commuters on the Cross City line which passes through the Royal Town can expect improvements. He said: “The Cross City line is very, very


good. It offers a ten-minute service into the middle of the city, and it’s much the preferred method of commuting for local people. “The really good news is that in May we are


moving to an improved evening frequency on the service too. We will also move to later trains out of Birmingham, because lots of people tell us that they like to get the train into the city for the evening, but then can’t always get one back. “Then, in May 2020, when we have new


rolling stock delivered, we’ll also move to an improved Sunday service.” The rail line through Sutton Park, which


opened in 1879, carried passengers until 1965, with stations running from Walsall through Streetly, the park itself, Walmley and Penns. Mr Street said that his next manifesto


could include proposals to put passenger services back onto the line. He added: “There are other schemes that


are more advanced and can be delivered more quickly like those in South Birmingham.


West Midlands mayor Andy Street Ark Media reclaims top 50 spot


Ark Media have been ranked among the UK’s top 50 corporate video production companies for the second year running. The Top 50 Report is published by the media


industry’s “Televisual” magazine, which also provides commentary on the state of the corporate video production landscape. The report said that as video content becomes


more prevalent, brands are realising the quality of their videos needs to be higher. Ark Media are ranked 46th in the report, up


three places from 2018. Managing director Phil Arkinstall said: “It’s not


just a case of producing content for the sake of producing content but having a clear strategy behind it and quality production values to ensure the piece is stand out and engages the audience.” Ark Media started 2019 in style by winning the


Vega Digital Award for best online sports video and the Sutton Coldfield Chamber’s Small Business of the Year award.


Phil added: “The team at Ark has expanded


over the last six months, meaning we are serving more clients with video for both external and internal communications. “We are working with national and


international clients as well as those more local to Sutton. It’s great for the team to be recognised for their work.”


Film stars: The Ark Media team “But in my next manifesto we will be talking


about reopening the Sutton Park line as well. I think that’s very important, particularly as we development on the Walmley side of the Royal Town.”


In Brief


Marketing agency Edge Creative has picked up what must be its most unusual client – a property investment firm based more than 6,000 miles away in Cambodia. Invest Asian was founded by whizzkid Reid


Kirchenbauer, who, by his mid-20s, could speak several languages and owned more than a dozen properties. Although the firm invests in property in


Asia, it chose to hire an agency on the other side of the world to assist with a brochure for offshoot brand, Khmer Ventures. Louise Panayides, Edge’s founder and


creative director, said: “The project has been a huge success and I am proud to say that we were able to add value along the way by further developing the Khmer Venture Fund brand through additional services such as copywriting, infographics, specialist print and an a interactive PDF - all packaged up and shipped to Cambodia on time.” Ms Panayides said that Mr Kirchenbauer had


used Edge rather than a more local firm because he was “impressed with Edge’s previous work for similar clients in the finance sector” and “wanted an agency that understood the complexities of the financial industry and somewhere that could assist with the creation process of the brochure.”


A Sutton Coldfield mum-of-two is set to lay down the law – after being appointed a deputy district judge. Solicitor Natalie Bradshaw (pictured), who


works at Bell Lax Solicitors, will sit on the Midlands Circuit from this summer, hearing cases on a huge patch that spans from Telford to Lincoln. The 34-year-old found out about her


appointment on Valentine’s Day, following a long recruitment process that began in March last year. Natalie said: “I’m really delighted – although


I have a little bit of ‘imposter syndrome’ at the moment, in that it doesn’t feel quite real yet!” Natalie, who lives in Mere Green with


husband Christopher, four-year-old daughter Isabella and son Sebastian, two, specialises in clinical negligence and construction disputes, and will hear civil and family cases as a judge. She said: “I’ll be hearing everything from


landlord disputes and evictions, to repossessions and non- molestation orders.” Natalie joined Bell


Lax in 2007 as a trainee solicitor and qualified at the long- standing Sutton firm, which is based in the former TSB building near the Empire cinema. She expects to serve


as a deputy district judge for around 30 days a year, allowing her to carry on her work at the firm.


May 2019 CHAMBERLINK 55


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