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Opinion CHAMBER


The Official Publication of Greater Birmingham Chambers of Commerce


LINK


Editor’s View


By John Lamb


Youngsters ensure our city has a bright future


Sutton Coldfield


Chamber of Commerce


Greater Birmingham


Commonwealth Chamber of Commerce


As we know, Birmingham is Europe’s youngest city and those millennials et al have certainly made their mark this month. And we enjoyed an amazing climax from a


group of young people who set the Chamber dinner at the ICC alight. We invited Aston Performing Arts Academy


Greater Birmingham


Transatlantic Chamber of Commerce


(APAA) back for the third year and they just get better and better. This year’s performance of dance and music


Front cover: Jean Templeton, winner of the President’s Award, with Saqib Bhatti See page 10


Editor John Lamb 0121 607 1781, 0797 1144064 j.lamb@birmingham-chamber.com


Deputy Editor Dan Harrison 0121 607 1887, 0797 1144052 d.harrison@birmingham-chamber.com


Reporter Jessica Brookes 0750 8317356 j.brookes@birmingham-chamber.com


You can now read the latest issue of CHAMBERLINK and view back issues online at: www.greaterbirminghamchambers.com


was around homelessness and the horrendous knife crime which is plaguing Birmingham and other parts of the UK. Much of the theme of the night was about


business as a force for good and the audience of 1,300 people responded in a very positive way. In fact, they gave APAA a standing ovation in


the biggest reception of the evening. Their superb singers and the perfectly choreographed performance made anyone who has tried to get a band of five together envious. And they demonstrated an absolute grip of the problem in a powerful way. APAA, who are now based in the city centre,


Published by


are dedicated to working with the next generation of emerging talent in Birmingham, offering music tuition and performance opportunities. It is the brainchild of entrepreneur Tru Powell


Kemps Publishing Ltd 11 The Swan Courtyard, Charles Edward Road, Birmingham B26 1BU 0121 765 4144 www.kempspublishing.co.uk


Managing Editor Laura Blake Designer Lloyd Hollingworth


Advertising 0121 765 4144 jon.jones@kempspublishing.co.uk


Printers Stephens & George Print Group


PRIVACY NOTICE: Kemps Publishing Ltd process personal information for certain legitimate interest purposes, which includes the following: • To provide postal copies of this publication to Chamber members and Kemps' customers; and


• To offer marketing and promotional opportunities within this publication to Chamber members and prospects.


Whenever we process data for these purposes, we always ensure we treat your Personal Data rights in high regard. If you wish to, you can visit www.kempspublishing.co.uk to view our full Privacy Notice and to learn more about our legitimate interests and your rights in this regard.


CHAMBERLINK is produced on behalf of Greater Birmingham Chambers of Commerce by Kemps Publishing Ltd and is distributed to members without charge. The Chambers and the publisher are committed to achieving the highest quality standards. While every care has been taken to ensure that the information it contains is accurate, neither the Chambers nor the publisher can accept any responsibility for any omission or inaccuracies that might arise. Views expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of the Chambers. This publication (or any part thereof) may not be reproduced, transmitted or stored in print or electronic format without prior written permission of Kemps Publishing Ltd.


4 CHAMBERLINK May 2019


and have already made their mark in Birmingham with performances at the opening of Grand Central Station, the tenth anniversary of the Bull Ring and the Midlands Media Awards. They work with around 100 people aged between six and 24 every week, encouraging them to build their self- esteem, confidence and skills in the arts.


The self-funding APAA deserves all of the


support it can get. It’s a great cause and one that will certainly uncover some outstanding talent in our city that otherwise might have gone undiscovered. Another event where youth shone was in the BirminghamLive’s 30 under 30 list for top young professionals in the city. Anna Assinder, manager of Future Faces, and


Henrietta Brealey, director of policy and strategic relationships at the GBCC, were deservedly on the list. Ms Assinder manages the Chamber’s young


professionals arm, Future Faces, which helps young professionals develop, network with other young professionals and recognise outstanding future leaders. Future Faces Chamber, now in its seventh


year, has doubled in size during the past year. Future Faces president, Mark Hipwell, was also


named on this year’s 30 under 30 list. Ms Brealey oversees the Chamber’s top tier of membership, patronage, and a number of campaigning, research and stakeholder engagement activities. She and her team of four policy and patron


advisers compile economic business reports, conduct campaigns into business adaptability, leadership and people management and produce a range of tools and aids for businesses. She is the leading coordinator for the Chamber on Brexit, and launched the Chamber’s Brexit Health Check and Toolkit. It’s good to know that Birmingham is in good hands with young people like this.


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