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Refrigeration Supplier opinion


If you want to entice your customers by showcasing your fresh, healthy


ingredients, make sure you display them in the best possible way onsumer demand for fresh, healthy food, made fast, has been on the increase for years. These


offerings now dominate the high street and there are no signs that demand is slowing down. People are becoming increas- ingly more conscious of what they eat, demanding food that is healthier, higher quality, less pro- cessed and more sustainable. Research shows we’re willing to pay more for better food, but we’re not willing to wait.


This movement, for fresher, faster food, has shaped today’s fast-casual food industry. Many fast-casual restaurants have found success with an ‘assembly line’ approach. The ability to offer an extensive and customisable menu of on-demand dishes, while successfully processing high volumes of traffic, is crucial to their success. The model isn’t limited to sandwiches, with additional categories like pizza also seeing the benefits of this personalised approach. The idea of showcasing ingre- dients and the preparation of the meal reinforces product fresh- ness. The ingredients themselves become the focus, as the cus- tomer moves down the line, deciding what looks good and constructing their bespoke meal. But it’s not just the quality of


the food that keeps people coming back – it’s the experience. People enjoy watching their meal being prepared: pick a bread or base, top with an extensive choice of ingredients, watch it being cooked, and it’s served and ready to eat, all within a few minutes. Some pizza concepts promote more than 50 toppings, all on dis- play to entice the customer, and refrigeration equipment – spe- cifically, refrigerated prep tables – are integral to this process. Staff need ready access to many ingredients and refrigerated food wells built into the top of the units


78 | The Caterer | 28 April 2017


“The idea of showcasing ingredients and the preparation of the meal


provide visibility to the customer. The arrangement and sizes of the ingredient pans can be configured to the operation, with larger pans for higher-volume ingredients. A factor of utmost importance,


reinforces product freshness”


but often taken for granted, is pan temperature. Pre-prepared ingre- dients are susceptible to bacteria and rapid spoilage if not suitably refrigerated, and the best prep tables maintain a safe and uniform temperature across all pans, keeping ingredients fresher for longer. Nobody wants to eat mushy tomato or brown lettuce,


but the effects of poorly refriger- ated ingredients can be much more severe. When was the last time you checked the temperature of your food pans?


As part of our commitment to be the most complete refrigeration solution, True manufactures over 60 unique prep table products, of varying sizes and applications, to suit almost every requirement. More information on the complete True Refrigeration range is available at www.truemfg.com


www.thecaterer.com


Fresh thinking C


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