This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
More online www.thecaterer.com


a set number of cookery books to help them research the dish and draw up their work plans. Everyone has a copy of Larousse and Escoffier, and all have at least one Roux- penned tome, including Michel Roux’s Pas- try: Savoury & Sweet. The first finalist is called to the cooking station, and the rest follow at 10-minute intervals. “I think of all the Roux Scholarship finals I have judged, this dish has to be one of the toughest,” says Martin, out of the finalists’ earshot. “There are lots of things that can go wrong. There are elements all the way through the dish that you can bugger up.” So just how does this dish rank against those


chosen for previous finals? “All the recipes are difficult,” explains Roux Jr. “But that’s why we impose them: because it gives the chefs an opportunity to showcase their knowl- edge of classic skills. Every dish we have ever chosen has thrown up a different set of challenges.


“The important thing is that there is room


for interpretation. We always deliberately give the chefs far too many ingredients. For this dish, they can use the bread or omit it, they can use the veal liver or not. There are 101 ways they can go with this – it’s up to them to sur- prise us – and that’s important. Just as long as it’s recognisable as a stuffed saddle of hare,” he adds with a grin.


“I think of all the Roux Scholarship finals I have judged, this dish has to be


one of the toughest” James Martin


Luke Selby (above) and his winning dish


The finalists


●Oliver Downey, Fera at Claridges’s, London


●Scott Dineen, BaxterStorey (Black Rock), London


●Martin Carabott, Luca Restaurant, London


●Luke Selby, Dabbous, London ●Matthew Whitfield, the Driftwood Hotel, Portscatho, Cornwall


●Michael Cruickshank, Bohemia, St Helier, Jersey


www.thecaterer.com 28 April 2017 | The Caterer | 29





PHOTOGRAPHY: JODI HINDS


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92