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“Eclairs are a dessert trend caterers will be seeing more of,” she says. “But not just any eclairs – premium eclairs with flavoured crème pâtissière and exciting icing designs that will get the tills ringing.” Tipiak has a range of frozen French Pop Eclairs, a mini version of the choux classic, that come in a variety of flavours, including crème brûlée, chocolate orange, and raspberry and blackcurrant.


Size matters Chef James Tanner’s new ‘Inspired By’ choco- late pavé, launched in partnership with Aryzta Food Solutions and chocolate manufacturer Callebaut, is a frozen dessert that can be defrosted and served from a 36 pre-portioned box or “pimped and paired”, says Tanner. The pavé is made with Callebaut’s 70% Ecuadorian Origin chocolate and it has a rich chocolate brownie base topped with a milk chocolate praline feuilletine and chocolate truffle, decorated with chocolate mirror glaze and cacao nibs. Although it makes a generous dessert on its own, Tanner suggests serving it with other flavours such as gingerbread, ber- ries, coffee, passion fruit, rum, whisky or nuts. “The portion size was probably my biggest


challenge,” admits Tanner. “It is an indulgent dessert, so the portions had to be smaller, but the 98g-sized portion is still a special treat.” Helen Vass, head pastry chef of Number 16


restaurant in Glasgow and part of the winning team on 2016’s Bake Off: Crème de la Crème, also recognises the importance of an indul- gent dessert on a menu. She combines the very best local and seasonal Scottish produce with modern cooking techniques, but her speciality is chocolate.


“When we send out the special occasion desserts to our guests – whether it’s a choco- late entremet or a piped message on a plate – it creates a really special moment for the customer. They are more likely to remember their visit to the restaurant and, hopefully, they will return,” she says.


Savoury flavour Vass’s team mate on Bake Off, Mark Tilling, master chocolatier and resident tutor at Squires Kitchen in Farnham, Surrey, says that savoury flavours are becoming more popular in desserts, with soy sauce, chilli and bacon being used in tradition- ally sweet creations. “Herbs such as rosemary and basil work particularly well to enhance certain flavour notes in choc- olate, so I’m expect- ing to see more of them on dessert menus,” says Tilling. Tilling’s lat-


est book, Mas- tering Chocolate, covers the choco-


56 | The Caterer | 28 April 2017 Mark Tilling Tipiak’s mini eclair and macaron


late story from bean to bar, offers tips on tempering chocolate, and includes 20 recipes, from hot chocolate and whisky truffles to a show-stopping chocolate croquembouche.


To blend or not to blend? Julie Sharp, Callebaut UK’s development chef, says single-origin chocolate is the new super- star product for chefs. “Single-origin chocolate has a unique taste profile that reflects the soil, the climate and the environment in which the cocoa is grown – similar to the production of wine. Not only does single-origin chocolate give flavour characteristics essential to menu development, it also offers a heritage and story that chefs appreciate.


“On the other hand, blended chocolates are more flexible when it comes to flavour and allow for wider use. Chocolatiers may add full- cream milk powder to a recipe for a creamy, indulgent product, similar to a Swiss choco- late; or add skimmed milk powder to allow the cocoa notes to come through for a more mature taste. They may even blend beans from several countries to give the most suitable taste profile for the product’s use. Both blended and


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