This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
More online www.thecaterer.com into retirement


“The common perception is that you’re catering to old dears sitting in a lounge that smells of pee, and it’s not that any more” Paul Robottom


that helps people to learn what living with the condition is like. “Everyone we employ will be a Dementia Friend too, so they can understand how to deal with and comfort dementia suffer- ers. Empathy, sympathy and respect is vital and so is the training to give people the tools they need to do their job properly.” And there is no reason not to. Training is free of charge through workshops run by the Alzheimer’s Society, he adds. But it doesn’t stop there.


Sensory service Robottom explains: “We’re working with a com- pany called Namaste, which deals with the five senses, to look at how food can trigger memory


www.thecaterer.com


gain.” The company sets up rooms for the resi- dents in order to evoke memories. For example, the residents go into a room that has sensory triggers of the seaside, from the sounds of sea- gulls and waves to the smell of fish and chips with vinegar served out of newspaper. In dealing with loneliness – “the second big- gest killer” – Robottom again leads from the front as a volunteer for Silverline, a helpline established by Dame Esther Rantzen that is the equivalent of Childline for older people. “Silverline is crying out for volunteers, who have to be DBS-cleared. But people working in the care environment are DBS-cleared anyway, so there’s a great hub of people we can use as volunteers.” Signature Dining has also launched an apprenticeship aimed at the senior market, inspired by a similar scheme at DIY chain B&Q. Robottom says the Apprentice Senior- ship Academy Programme (ASAP) recruits, trains and pays people in their 50s to 70s. For the residents, a workforce that includes older


28 April 2017 | The Caterer | 25





Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92