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Equipment guide


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reen credentials, sustainability and connected technology rank among the most common terms in the world of catering equipment. As you turn the pages of The Caterer’s


Equipment Guide 2017, you will see the theme of energy efficiency emerging strongly. Whether that’s from induction ranges designed to fit smaller, more bijou kitchens, or a grand, bespoke design upgraded from gas. The chefs we talk to also tell us about streamlining or future-proofing their kitchens, which might involve installing an all-singing, all-dancing range or modular units that allow your kitchen to adapt to fast-changing menu trends. Equipment that cooks at speed remains another key


buying factor for operators, alongside equipment that saves time by allowing brigades to cook in volume and at quieter periods in the day or night. The casual dining sector has continued to grow and equipment intended for this segment of hospitality has become more sophisticated as a result. High-performance prime cooking equipment, combining design and functionality, including baking and wood and stone pizza ovens, has evolved and the use of charcoal ovens and grills is on the rise. In an ever-changing UK political landscape, maintenance and service providers will be vying for repeat custom based on reliability and price. Customers will, of course, continue to expect perfection.


Lisa Jenkins Products and suppliers editor The Caterer


66 | The Caterer | 28 April 2017


www.thecaterer.com


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