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safety wise


Clearing For Reliability Right of way maintenance makes sense


O


ne of the most important ways that Kiwash Electric provides reliable service is right-of-way clearing, or vegetation management.


A right-of-way (ROW) refers to a strip of land underneath or around power lines that your electric co-op has the right and responsibility to maintain and clear. Trees must grow at a distance far enough from wires that they won’t cause harm to individuals or disrupt electric service. A general guideline of maintaining a safe ROW is 15 feet of clearance on either side of the primary conductors and 20 feet of clearance above the highest wire on the pole.


When trees and shrubs encroach on this safe distance, Kiwash Electric crews must trim them back. Chemical control methods are also used to support the growth of low growing plants that will out-compete the tall trees plants beneath power lines.


Power lines can carry up to 34,500 volts, making an energized tree branch incredibly deadly. Be mindful of trees that are close to power lines, and make sure your children know that climbing trees near power lines is extremely dangerous.


Remember to contact Kiwash Electric if you decide to trim or remove trees near any power service or line. And never trim a tree in the right-of-way zone on your own. For more information on Kiwash Electric’s right of way management program, please call 888-832-3362.


Spicy Rapid Roast Chicken INGREDIENTS


1 (3 lb) whole chicken 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano 1/4 teaspoon dried basil


1/4 teaspoon paprika 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper


DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 450°F.


Rinse chicken thoroughly inside and out under cold running water and remove all fat. Pat dry with paper towels.


Put chicken into a small baking pan. Rub with olive oil. Mix the salt, pepper, oregano, basil, paprika and cayenne pepper together and sprinkle over chicken.


Roast the chicken in the preheated oven for 20 minutes. Lower the oven to 400° F. and continue roasting to a minimum internal temperature of 165 °F., about 40 minutes more. Let cool 10 to 15 minutes and serve.


SOURCE: ALLRECIPES.COM


Right of way (ROW): Refers to a strip of land underneath and around power lines that your electric cooperative maintains and clears.Trees must grow at a distance far enough from electric lines that they will not cause harm to individuals, or disruption to electrical service.


Fifteen percent of power interruptions occur when trees, shrubs or bushes grow too close to power lines. By managing vegetation, your electric cooperative keeps power safe and reliable.


Vegetation Management Why right-of-way maintenance matters to you


✔Kiwash Electric Cooperative owns over 2,900 miles of electric line that spans a six-county region that


includes Washita, Kiowa, Custer,Dewey, Roger Mills and Blaine Counties.


✔Maintaining reliable and affordable electric service depends on providing a clear and unobstructed path


for electricity to travel. Clear rights-of-way mean fewer and shorter outages, reduced risk for co-op employees working on power lines, and less wear and tear on co-op vehicles and equipment.


Your cooperation is appreciated!


Kilowatt | MARCH 2015 | 4


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