This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
our Spring Storms Be Prepared for Spring Storms


Youth Tour


Benjamin Franklin once said that, “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” When it comes to severe weather, this saying can certainly ring true. Whether it is thunder and light- ning, high winds, tornadoes, hail, or flooding—making plans now can save lives later. Safe Electricity wants to help you succeed and encourages you to take some time now to pro- tect yourself and your family by preparing for severe weather before it strikes this spring. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agen- cy’s (FEMA) safety website, ready.gov, there were more than 440 fatalities and nearly 2,800 injuries in 2013 that were weather-related. These num- bers could be decreased if the proper precautions are taken. “What you learn now can be a lifesaver later. Knowledge and planning can save lives when a major storm front is headed your way,” says Austin Partida, Kay Electric Cooperative’s Di- rector of Marketing and Mem- ber Services. You can begin your prepara- tion by assembling necessary supplies for a potential power outage. Your emergency pre- paredness kit should include items such as water, food, flashlight, batteries, blankets, and a first aid kit. A full list of suggested items can be found at SafeElectricity.org.


The National Weather Service recommends that you: • Know the county you are located in and nearby towns and cities. Warnings are is- sued by county and reference major cities. • Know the difference be- tween a severe thunderstorm watch and warning. A watch means there is the possibility of storms, and a warning means a storm has been reported and you should take cover. • Check the forecast and the hazardous weather outlook. • Watch for signs of an ap- proaching storm. • Turn on a weather radio or an AM/FM radio for information if a storm is approaching. • Stay inside if you know a storm is headed your way. Make sure to plan ahead so you do not get caught outside in a storm. Lightning can strike up to 10 miles from the area in which it is raining, even if you do not see clouds. If you can hear thunder, you are within striking distance.


If you are inside when a storm hits, stay inside. Keep away from windows and go to the lowest level of your home. If you do get caught outdoors during a storm and are unable to take shelter in a building, take shelter in an enclosed ve- hicle with a hard-top roof—not an open-frame vehicle like a convertible.


If outside during a tornado and you cannot find shelter, do not take cover in a vehicle or under a highway overpass. Find a ditch or ravine, lie flat, and clasp your hands behind your head to protect yourself from flying debris.


423301


Most severe storms do not last more than a half hour; however, just because a storm has passed does not mean the danger is over. A variety of hazards are left behind. “Never touch downed power lines or objects that could be in contact with those lines. Just because power lines are dam- aged doesn’t mean that they are dead,” warns Partida. Touching a downed line or anything it has fallen on, like a fence or a tree limb, could get you injured or even killed. Stay away, and instruct others to do the same. If you come across downed power lines, call 911 and your utility immediately. Take the time to prepare now before the storm, and pay attention to weather alerts to keep your family safe. Learn more at SafeElectricity.org.


5


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154