This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Commentary Technology enhances communication T


Chris Meyers General Manager, Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


he advancement of digital tech- nologies has impacted local


communities served by your electric cooperatives. At the regional, national and international level, technology has merged into virtually every facet


of society. To electric cooperatives, technologi- cal innovations are an opportunity to enhance member experience and communication. Oklahoma’s Touchstone Energy Cooperatives are grounded in four core values: integrity, ac- countability, innovation and commitment to community. At their core, electric cooperatives are committed to empowering their members. To achieve this purpose, most co-ops in Okla- homa are deploying some form of Outage Man- agement System (OMS), paired with Geographic Information System (GIS) and Global Position- ing System (GPS) technologies to provide mem- bers an array of benefi ts. In general, co-ops using OMS technology offer members an up-to-date outage map, viewable from most devices. When used with GIS and GPS capabilities,


OMS technology interfaces with a co-op’s cus- tomer information system. Because OMS


technology relies on electrical engineering mod- ules for predictions, each point in a co-op’s trans- mission and/or distribution system must be digitally mapped. This mapping technology al- lows operations personnel to hold effective two- way communication, enabling both dispatchers and crews to be more effi cient in time-sensitive situations as well as in allocating resources. Back at the co-op, real-time information is dis-


played in its control room, where dispatchers constantly monitor outage restoration progress. Sophisticated mapping technologies also allow dispatchers to map co-op vehicles’ locations. This web of vital information connects electric coop- erative systems to the members they serve and allows members to be more aware of the outage restoration process. On Page 6 of this edition, you can read a story on how three co-ops in Oklahoma are implementing these technologies to further empower their members. Co-ops have been proactive and innovative in order to better serve their memberships for the last several years. Not long ago, it was common to see paper maps displayed in a co-op’s control room with pushpins determining the locations of all outages. With today’s technology, co-ops are making giant leaps and have added cutting-edge innovations to continue powering the needs of new generations.


Staying safe in your line of work H


Jimmy Taylor President, Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


eifer calving sea- son is upon us. As a rancher, it is rewarding to see


the new mom get up, lick her calf clean and watch it nurse for the fi rst time. In no time, the newborn will be exploring its new world. This process doesn’t always


go smoothly. Sometimes the heifer needs assis- tance. The heifer, however, is not always cooper- ative, especially in a pasture. To accomplish this task, the heifer must be in labor enough to be distracted. Even then, I have to crawl on the ground, approaching from the rear out of sight. I have to avoid making noises, such as the rattling of the pulling chain, as I po- sition loops around the calf’s protruding feet. To minimize noise I pre-make these loops, placing them loosely on my hand. I position them so they are far enough back on my hand they won’t fall off, but not too far back so they won’t close on my wrist.


Once while attempting this, the heifer wasn’t 4


as distracted and immobilized by the birthing process as I thought. When I got one loop around the calf’s hoof, she sensed me behind her. She scrambled to her feet, came backward instead of forward and knocked the second loop around my wrist.


At that point I didn’t have much choice, so I jumped to my feet and away we went. I fi gured out quickly that our goals confl icted. I was trying to stay on my feet and run fast enough to get slack in the chain to get it off my wrist. She was trying to get away from me; the faster I ran, the faster she ran. Fortunately for me, I got the chain off right before I gave out. I thought I’d considered safety in my preparations, but apparently not enough. Oklahoma’s electric cooperatives take safety seriously. Your statewide association, OAEC, of- fers extensive safety training and conferences through its Safety & Loss Control Department. Co-op line crews lack no passion for what they do, but it is crucial that they return safely to their families at the end of each work day. Regardless of your line of work, please be safe in all your daily endeavors.


Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives Chris Meyers, General Manager Jimmy Taylor, President


Kendall Beck, Vice-President Gary McCune, Secretary Scott Copeland, Treasurer


Staff


Sid Sperry, Director of PR & Communications sksperry@oaec.coop


Anna Politano, Editor editor@ok-living.coop


Daniel Yates, Advertising Manager dyates@ok-living.coop


Kirbi Mills, Offi ce Manager kmills@oaec.coop


Hillary Barrow, Accountant/Offi ce Manager Asst. hbarrow@oaec.coop


Hayley Leatherwood, Multimedia Specialist hleatherwood@ok-living.coop


Alexis Mellons, Advertising Intern adintern@ok-living.coop


Taryn Sanderson, Editorial Intern intern@oaec.coop


Editorial, Advertising and General Offi ces P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154 Phone (405) 478-1455


Oklahoma Living online: www.ok-living.coop Subscriptions


$3.12 per year for rural electric cooperative members.


$6.00 per year for non-members. Cooperative Members: Report change of


address to your local rural electric cooperative. Non-Cooperative Members: Send address


changes to Oklahoma Living, P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309.


Oklahoma Living (ISSN 1064-8968),


USPS 407-040, is published monthly for consumer-members of Oklahoma’s rural electric cooperatives by the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives, 2325 E. I-44 Service Road, P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154- 1309.


Circulation this issue: 321,771


Periodical postage paid at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Association of Electric


Cooperatives is a statewide service organization for the following electric cooperatives: Alfalfa, Arkansas Valley, Caddo, Canadian Valley,


Central Rural, Choctaw, Cimarron, Cookson Hills, Cotton, East Central Oklahoma, Harmon, Indian, KAMO Power, Kay, Kiamichi, Kiwash, Lake Region, Northeast Oklahoma, Northfork,


Northwestern, Oklahoma, Ozarks, People’s, Red River Valley, Rural, Southeastern, Southwest


Rural, Tri-County, Verdigris Valley, and Western Farmers Electric Cooperative.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154