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PAGE 2 | MARCH 2015


Team Player: Travis Holdeman, Metering Manager T


ravis Holdeman began his career in the electric industry ten years


ago at North Plain Electric Cooperative in Perryton, Texas. He started as a groundman on the line crew.


After a year, he came to TCEC in 2006 as a groundman in the lineman apprentice program. When he was a third year


apprentice lineman, he transferred to the metering department as a meter reader and later became a meter technician. Today, he is the manager of the metering department. He leads a five- person team responsible for the installation, maintenance and testing of nearly 23,000 advanced meters. His team also ensures the data sent and received by the meters reaches TCEC’s office accurately. Tis energy use data is presented to member service representatives and the members themselves.


Because TCEC uses advanced metering infrastructure, Holdeman’s team performs complex technical tasks. Tey troubleshoot issues and test meters when necessary. Until recently, the meter technicians had to pull meters from the field and bring them to the office to calibrate and test them. Today, they have an advanced piece of equipment to do that work in the field, saving much time and effort.


Occasionally, TCEC’s metering technicians handle member inquiries related to their meters and energy use. Holdeman’s team will educate members on the accuracy of their meters and help them find ways to reduce their energy use and lower their bills. Because the meters TCEC uses are fairly new, they are rarely inaccurate.


TCEC’s advanced metering infrastructure that Travis and his


Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month


TRAVIS HOLDEMAN USING PORTABLE TESTING EQUIPMENT FOR ANALYSIS.


team help maintain provides members with real-time data on their energy consumption. Tis data can help pinpoint devices that are wasting electricity. It also helps member service representatives answer member questions regarding their bills.


“The technical aspect of the job is rewarding because it changes so quickly and it keeps me on my toes,” Holdeman said. “But I also very much enjoy the member interaction aspect of the job.”


Travis and his wife Tammie live in Turpin with their son Brekken, age 5. Tey have six older children. Travis and Brekken enjoy remote control (RC) car building and racing. Tey build the RC cars to one-eighth scale and travel to towns like Garden City for the races. In addition to spending time with his family, Travis enjoys softball and bowling. He is also active in the Turpin Booster Club. n


They’re out of sight, but don’t forget about your air ducts. Taking care of them can save money and energy. Check ducts for air leaks. Take care of minor sealing jobs with heat-approved tape, especially in attics and in vented crawl spaces. Call the pros for major ductwork repairs. Source: U.S. Department of Energy


Electrical Safety Tip of the Month Before installing


a portable air conditioner, make sure that the electrical circuit and the outlet are able to handle the load.


Source: Electrical Safety Foundation International


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