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co-op issues


Walker Retires from Co-op Board She blazed new trails as the first female to serve on the Kiwash Electric board


V


irginia Walker, Kiwash Electric Cooperative District 4 trustee, and the first woman to serve


on the co-op board of directors, announced her plans to retire from the board effective September 1, 2014.


Walker began her service with Kiwash Electric in May of 2000, when she was appointed to fill the term of retiring co-op board member Jerry Willard. Walker was recruited for the position by Kiwash board members who felt she possessed a sound understanding of rural issues in co-op service territory due to her many years with the OSU Cooperative Extension Service.


Dennis Krueger, Kiwash Electric general manager, said Walker’s contribution to the board will be missed. “She was a committed and dedicated board member who applied her Cooperative Extension experience and business skills to every decision,” Krueger noted.


As the first woman on the Kiwash Electric board, Walker blazed a trail that left little doubt of her competency. During her tenure, Walker held leadership positions that included vice president of the board of trustees. She also served for many years as secretary-treasurer of the board, and assistant-secretary treasurer.


“We will all miss Virginia Walker’s leadership and contributions to this co-op. Her retirement is certainly well earned,” said Krueger.


Virginia Walker, District #4 trustee, will retire from the co-op board on September 1, 2014.


Co-op bylaws require current board members to appoint a new District 4 representative to serve out the remainder of Walker’s term. Krueger said the board is expected to create a nominating committee this month. This committee will follow Kiwash bylaws and policies in selecting a replacement.Interested persons who live within the boundaries of District #4 are encouraged to contact Kiwash President Jack Sawatzky for details.


Please watch your newsletter for further updates.


ENERGY EFFICIENCY Tip of the Month


When it’s hot outside, appliances and lighting can actually heat up our homes more than we think. To save energy, minimize the activities that generate additional heat, such as burning open flames, continuously running a computer, or using hot-hair devices like curling irons. This will ultimately keep your house cooler.


Source: Department of Energy


Capital Credit Payments Cont’d


capital credit account in his or her name or company name. Each time the board calculates and allocates capital credits you receive the benefit in that account. The board of directors has made arrangements for your capital check refund to be mailed on or about September 1, 2014.


When the September checks are written, Kiwash Electric will have paid over $2 million dollars in total capital credits or margin refunds back to the membership. After a long summer anything to reduce your bill must be a blessing. So members purchasing electricity from Kiwash prior to 2013 should expect a capital credit refund in the mail, unless that margin check is less than $5.


For those who are new to Kiwash Electric service, you are a member of a cooperative and any margins or profits made by this organization are returned to you via a capital credit issuance. If you are a former co-op member and have since moved off Kiwash lines, your check will also be mailed to you.


Did You Know


Kiwash Electric Cooperative has returned more than


$2 million


in capital credits to members! Since 1988, electric


cooperatives in the U.S. have retired


$11 billion to co-op members.


SOURCE: NATIONAL RURAL UTILITIES COOPERATIVE FINANCE CORPORATION AND


KIWASH ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE.


Kilowatt | SEPTEMBER 2014 | 3


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