This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
September, 2014 www.harmonelectric.com


Britton, Richard and Joblin Attend Cooperative Leadership Camp


Harmon Electric Association sponsored Alexa Britton of Granite,


Tristan Richard of Hollis and Matt Joblin of Olustee to attend the Cooperative Youth Leadership Camp in Steamboat Springs, CO from July 12-18. Alexa and Tristan were selected through a process of applications, essays and interviews while Matt was returning this year as a peer elected camp Ambassador. Britton, Richard and Joblin took a bus to camp with nine Oklahoma


youth and 33 Kansas youth. Once the students arrived at camp they joined other youth from Colorado and Wyoming. “Harmon Electric is proud to participate in the Cooperative Youth


Leadership Camp and send our youth to develop essential leadership and teamwork skills,” said Charles Paxton, CEO of Harmon Electric. “T rough this trip, we hope that local students will gain some awareness of how our electric cooperatives work and how important it is for the youth to be involved in our community.” T e main objectives of the Cooperative Youth Leadership


Camp were to help the youth gain a better understanding of how their electric cooperatives operate while also building the youths’ leadership skills by running a “candy cooperative.” When the youth arrived at camp they paid membership dues, established a board of trustees, elected a general manager, and formed committees.10900 T e campers learned about electric cooperatives through many


of the presentations and activities: Yampa Valley Electric’s linemen gave the campers a high voltage safety demonstration, the campers participated in competition to build a model transmission line out of craſt supplies, and they toured Trapper Mine and Craig Power Plant. T e campers also hiked Fish Creek Falls; visited Steamboat Springs; went river raſt ing; and enjoyed camp activities such as volleyball,


swimming, a dance, and a talent show. Overall, the campers leſt with a new sense of what leadership


means to them. “T ese student leaders will be great representatives of both their electric cooperatives and their communities,” said Shana Read, Kansas Electric Cooperative youth director.


“We are


pleased to continue this tradition of taking Oklahoma youth to learn about electric cooperatives and our nation’s government.” “I learned that I can be a leader and not a follower”, said Richard,


“T e power plant made an impact on what I would love to do.” Britton states that she didn’t know what confi dence she had until this week and also discussed one of the speeches that really inspired her. At the end of the Cooperative Youth Leadership Camp, the youth


elected ambassadors. Ambassadors are students who return to the camp the following year as a junior counselor. In their ambassador roles, they will facilitate the camp leadership activities and act as role models for the incoming campers. T is year’s ambassador, Matt Joblin, reports “Last year as a camper


I saw myself grow and evolve into a leader. T is year I got a lot of enjoyment seeing others grow and become the leaders of tomorrow.” He also quoted his favorite saying of the week: “If we’re not trying to make the world a better place, then what the heck are we doing here?” Harmon Electric sponsors the trip of two students each year. To win


the trip, students are asked to write an essay with a predetermined title that changes each year. T ey then present a summary of their essays to a panel of judges who follow up with interview questions. For more information, contact Beth Penington at Harmon Electric or go to www.harmonelectric.com


Alexa


Tristan


Matt


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160