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Northfork September 14 CONTENTS PAGE 2


Electricity Remains a Good Value


PAGE 3


End of Summer Recipes


PAGE 4


Light Up Your Patio for After-Dark Enjoyment


Sparks & Flashes Please Join Us


Supplement to Oklahoma Living in Taking Action


New regulations proposed by the EPA threaten reliable, affordable power. Please join us in taking a stand to keep electric bills affordable. Visit www.Action.coop.


NFEC offices will be closed Monday, Sept. 1 in recogni- tion of Labor Day. Please call 1-800-668- 6587 to report an outage or a safety hazard.


Every day we rely on electricity. We depend on the refrigerator to keep our food fresh, air con- ditioning and heating to keep us comfortable and, of course, lights on a daily basis. We also depend on electricity to re-charge our electronics. Wheth- er it’s a phone to keep in touch with relatives, a tablet for students’ homework or the laptop on which we stream movies, these devices all have become integral to our daily routine. At work, we rely on electricity to power our computers, phones, lights and productivity. With- out this consistent, reliable and affordable power source, businesses would relocate, jobs would be lost and prices of goods and services would increase. That’s why Northfork Electric is concerned about the latest proposed regulations on existing power plants from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This round of rules impacts the power plants on which we rely every day. Cooperatives are different from other electric


utilities. We are owned by our member-consum- ers. When we look at our power options, we are not driven to make a profit. We strive to provide the most affordable and reliable electricity pos-


sible to our members.


Owning our own independent plants has al- lowed cooperatives to keep costs affordable. For co-ops, “energy independence” in part means in- dependence from expensive, profit-driven power. However, these new regulations could endan- ger this independent supply of affordable electric power. Electric cooperatives, like NFEC, are small businesses. We’re not large utilities with several different power plants operating with a variety of fuel sources. Through our wholesale power supplier, Western Farmers Electric Coop- erative, other area distribution cooperatives such as NFEC built power plants when it made sense for our members. But the way the new rules are written, we could be forced to close our plants and lose our independence. The EPA has drafted a regulation that ad- versely and disproportionately affects electric cooperatives. That’s why we are telling the EPA this regulation simply does not work for us. When the EPA drafted regulations limiting greenhouse gases from new power plants, the agency received more than 500,000 emails oppos- ing the regulation. Today we ask you once again, Con’t. on page 4


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