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Vol. 65 Number 11


News orthwestern Electric September 2014


Teaching children about electrical safety What they learn today could be a lifesaver later


T


eaching children about electrical safety is an important task we should all take seriously. Electricity is a dynamic power source. Everyday we live our lives surrounded by it, but sometimes we forget just how danger- ous electricity can be.


That is why Northwestern Electric established the Watts Up Kids Camp a couple of years ago. The camp teaches youngsters how to be safe around electricity. The camp pro- vides fun activities and facts about the basics—what is electricity, the need to respect its power and how to avoid accidents. This year, 16 youngsters attended


Watts Up Kids Camp on July 30. The children watched videos and a safety demonstration covering potential hazards like downed power lines, climbing trees near power lines and playing hide-and-seek near the big metal electrical boxes. Jarrod Randall, journeyman lineman for NWEC, demonstrated the various tools he uses to help keep him safe while on the job and he fielded some tough questions from the campers. While we do our best to educate children about electrical safety at the camp or school safety presenta- tions, we need your help to reinforce those lessons. You can do your part at home by teaching your children about the physical dangers associ- ated with electrical components and how to handle electrical plugs, out- lets, switches and other devices.


As we all know, kids will be kids. Getting them to show interest in some of these lessons won’t be easy but remember what your children learn from you today can be a lifesaver later when they encounter potential hazards. (9574002) Gather your youngsters around the kitchen table or on the front porch— some of the best teachable moments about electrical safety can happen in and around your home. Look around. There are plenty of oppor- tunities to demonstrate safety that are as close as the electrical outlet on your living room wall. For example, show young children how plugs


Inside


ERC loans......................2 Holiday closing.............2 Hot Dog Feeds..............3 Recipe............................3 Missing members.........4


A group of 16 eager youngsters attended the 2014 Watts Up Kids Camp. Back row: Sky Eckenrode, Bree Dryden, BrayLeigh Dryden, Zane Was- son, Hana-Kay Chapman, Jackson Crotts, Chandler Persons and Easton Persons. Front row: Joshua Crotts, Melodii McGee, Reese Adams, Tristyn Burgess, Brianna Marenco, Parker Zwink and Savannah Pierce. Not pic- tured: Emma Chapman.


work, and let them know that even if they are curious about the slits of an electrical outlet, nothing else should be placed inside. Each year about 2,400 children end up in the emer- gency room after suffering injuries caused by inserting objects—paper clips, pens, screws, nails, forks, hair pins, coins and more—into electri- cal receptacles. That’s about seven children a day who sustain injuries ranging from electric shock to burns. But this isn’t the only electrical mishap that impacts youngsters. Our reliance on electronics and gadgets have left both youngsters and their Continued on page 3.


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