This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Northfork Electric


Cooperative, Inc. Operating in


Beckham, Roger Mills, Washita, Greer, Custer, Harmon, and Dewey


SCOTT COPELAND GENERAL MANAGER


BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Jimmy Taylor-Pres ............................. Elk City Charles Hickey-V. Pres....................... Reydon Ransom Snowden-Sec-Treas ............. Erick Chris Mackey.................................... Sayre Larry Smith..................................Cheyenne Lloyd Joe Patton .............................. Sayre Danny Davis....................................Elk City Jack Ivester ...................................Attorney


SAYRE OFFICE


Kenny Waugh....................Mgr. of Marketing Lisa Dailey...................Mgr. of Office Services Jeff Mohr...................Mgr. of Acct. & Finance Kay Brown............................Adm. Assistant Richard Bowdre .................. Operations Mgr.


REYDON OFFICE Barbara Swope ..........................655-4557


FOR OUTAGES AFTER 5 P.M. CALL 1-800-NO-VOLTS (1-800-668-6587) or


(580) 928-3366


OFFICE HOURS 8 AM TO 5 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY


DATES TO REMEMBER READINGS MUST BE IN


NORTHFORK OFFICE BY THE 10th


OF EACH MONTH TO BE USED FOR BILLING


ADDRESS P.O. Box 400


SAYRE, OK 73662 301 E. MAIN


Electricity Remains a Good Value


by Scott Copeland NFEC General Manager


In today’s world, you won’t find many items that cost less than $6. You can purchase a gallon of milk, a gallon of gas or a Big Mac® meal from McDonald’s. But did you know an average day’s worth of electricity costs less than $6? In 2013, Northfork’s 3,075 residential accounts bought a total of nearly 60 million kiloWatt-hours at a cost of $6.4 million. Although everyone uses different amounts each day, the overall daily average for NFEC’s residential account is $5.72. Even in our country’s shifting energy climate, electricity remains a good value. In fact, electricity has the lowest cost per day of any of the items listed above. And not all of those items are necessary for daily life! As general manager of Northfork Electric, I urge you to think about your daily necessities (electricity and gasoline, to name a couple), and then think about the cost of the special treats we al- low ourselves to purchase on a weekly basis (maybe even on a daily basis for some items!) We don’t often question the cost of a Big Mac® meal – it costs over $1 more to buy a Big Mac® meal than it does to purchase a day’s worth of power. And yet, we frequently become upset if our electricity rates rise.


It makes sense; we have become increasingly reliant upon electricity. Electricity has, for many of us, gone from a luxury commodity to a necessity and an expectation. We expect the lights to come on when we flip


the switch, and we expect our power to stay on during the best and worst conditions. How else would we keep our food fresh, our homes cool in the summer or warm in the winter? It is easy to cut a Big Mac® out of your spending routine here and there to save a few dollars. But we cannot simply cut electricity out of our budgets if times get tough or we decide that we want to scale back our spending in order to save. It is nearly impossible for us to think about what our lives would be like if we did not have electricity. If at times it doesn’t seem electricity is affordable, remember – even as the demand for electricity grows – annual cost increases still remain low, especially when compared to other consumer goods such as medical care, educa- tion, gasoline and, yes, even Big Macs®. Electricity is still a great bargain. And also remember this: as the general manager of your local electric cooperative, I am com- mitted to making sure you and your family always have safe, reliable 1963-008 and affordable electric service in your home.


So the next time you crave a Big Mac®, remember your electric bill, and think about what a great deal you’re getting for your dollar!


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160