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power network ■ Purchased Power for CEC Territory


Choctaw Electric Cooperative serves 18,165 meters over a network of 3,534 miles of distribution line. CEC’s service area, (right), includes portions of Choctaw, McCurtain and Pushmataha counties, and parts of Atoka and Leflore counties.


Choctaw Electric purchases the electricity it delivers to your home from Western Farmers Electric Cooperative (WFEC), a generation and transmission cooperative based in Anadarko, Okla. WFEC is owned by its member electric co-ops in Oklahoma and New Mexico.


In 2013, Choctaw Electric purchased 438,525,500 kwh from WFEC at a cost of over $25.2 million. Currently 64 cents of every dollar you spend for power from Choctaw Electric is paid directly to WFEC for the cost of wholesale power.


With Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations looming over


Antlers


Hugo Idabel


Choctaw Electric service territory includes 3,534 miles of distribution line serving 18,165 meters. CEC members are located in Choctaw, McCurtain, Pushmataha, Atoka and Leflore counties.


power plants, electric utilities nationwide are bracing for higher costs. Electric co-ops rely on coal-fired generation to provide affordable electricity for roughly 50 percent of their members. Historically, coal fired electricity has proven to be more affordable than natural gas, with fewer and less dramatic price swings.


CHOCTAW ELECTRICOPERATING STATISTICS Energized Miles of Line..........................................................................................................


2013 3,534


Coop Investment per Mile of Line ......................................................................................$30,529 Number of Active Accounts....................................................................................................18,165 Accounts per Mile of Line...........................................................................................................5.14 Coop Investment per Account............................................................................................. $5,328 Average Residential Monthly Usage (kwh)...............................................................................1,131 Average Residential Monthly Bill........................................................................................$152.00 Average Cost per kwh.................................................................................................................$0.13


Choctaw Electric and other co-ops are pressing EPA officials and legislators to take another look at clean air regulations and consider their long term impact on rural residents.


Choctaw Electric Cooperative service territory includes some of the poorest regions in the state. CEC and other co-ops are making sure leaders in Washington, DC understand that higher electricity prices will hurt the very individuals who are less able to pay.


Your co-op leadership is monitoring this siutation closely. In the meantime, CEC members are encouraged to visit www. Action.coop to send a message to federal officials. The grassroots movement is currently responsible for uniting the voices of over half a million electric co-op members. If you aren’t happy with the upswing in electricity prices, please add yours to the mix.


inside•your•co-op | 5


Broken Bow


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