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Reaching farther with fiber optics


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ast month, Northeast Rural Services, Inc. (NRS) announced the undertaking of a new venture. T rough a newly established division, BOLT Fiber


Optic Services, the subsidiary will be bringing fi ber optic technology to northeast Oklahoma. BOLT Fiber Optic Services plans to off er Internet up to 1 gigabit as well as high defi nition television and video services. Customers will also have access to a Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephone service, being made available by an independent contractor. Since some of these services may be available from


other providers, one might ask “What makes BOLT ser- vices unique?” or “What is so special about fi ber optics?” Over the next several months these questions will be answered. Together we will learn more about fi ber optics and some of the benefi ts it off ers to residents and busi- nesses in northeast Oklahoma. T ere are several factors that make BOLT services


unique. T e one we will talk about in this issue is its delivery mechanism—optical fi ber. Optical what? Fiber? No, we aren’t talking about a


breakfast cereal or supplement. Optical fi ber is a cable containing strands of glass. Lasers transmit pulses of light that allows information to be carried through the glass to an end point, such as a computer or TV set top box. T e pulses are turned on and off rapidly. A single fi ber can carry multiple streams of information at the same time over diff erent wave- lengths or colors of light. Fiber optic cable has several advantages over oth-


er delivery mechanisms, such as copper wire or coaxial cable.


First, it is great for rural areas. Signals created by pulsating light can travel long distances inside fi ber cable without weakening. A stronger, digital signal relates better television reception and clearer VoIP telephone conversations than traditional types of cable. It also requires less equipment to reach greater distances. Less


equipment equals lower cost, less maintenance and fewer points of failure, thus optimizing reliability. Fiber is easy to deploy. It is thin and fl exible—


thinner even than a human hair. In fact, according to Broadband Communities publication, “one bundle of fi ber cable not much thicker than a pencil can carry all of the world’s communication traffi c.” T e size, weight and fl exibility of this type of cable allows for easier installation. It allows for more TV channels and Internet bandwidth to come into one’s home or business over a smaller cable. Once fi ber is installed, it does not have to be re-


placed when there is a technology upgrade. Instead, the fi ber remains in place and the equipment that creates and receives the light pulses are changed. T is allows for less inconvenience to the customer. Fiber is rugged and weatherproof. Fiber optic cable has a longer life than copper because it does not corrode, is not easily aff ected by water and generates no heat. It is also resistant to lightning. Its durability allows for less maintenance and increased reliability. Finally, the operating cost for fi ber optics is lower


and the environmental benefi ts are higher. It costs less to operate a fi ber network. T e technology employed by BOLT uses light signals instead of electronics. Lower operating costs allow fi ber optic to remain competitive in price against many of the older technology materials, such as copper, that are available to consumers. T e advantages of fi ber optic cable are many and that makes it uniquely superior to the technology other carries may use to provide Internet, television and tele- phone services. Over a network constructed by BOLT Fiber Optic Services, customers will enjoy service that is reliable, far reaching and requires little maintenance. For more information or to sign up for BOLT


Fiber Optic Services, call 1-800-256-6405, email: info@boltfi ber.com, or visit www.neelectric.com. 


January 2014 - 7


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