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Langley Parks Cooperative employees tackled the task of paint-


ing park benches, swing sets, a concession stand, re- strooms, bleachers, backstops and fence rails for three ball fi elds. Bleachers with rusted sections benefi ted from


new pipe and re-welding. Dead limbs were trimmed from trees and several dead trees were removed alto- gether. Repairs were made to backstop screens. T e old library building nearby also received a


T is project was diff erent than the other projects. In- stead of painting and repair, it entailed installing two- inch conduit underground from the existing service location in the village to outside of the village so that the existing overhead service could be retired. A trench was dug from the building where the


existing service was located, through a paved roadway/ walkway and between two cabins to the location of the future pad-mount transformer and meter base. Since Har-Ber Village survives solely on grants


and donations, it is limited in what it can do for itself. “T is work benefi ts Har-Ber Village by saving it


the expense of labor and equipment associated with this type of construction,” explained project leader Larry Cisneros, also the cooperative’s Manager of En- gineering Services. “It will be a cleaner installation for them and it also helps us by removing access problems we would have had getting to the pole and transformer in the village. Now the service and metering is on the outside of the village where we have direct access. T e small entrance to the village to access the existing pole would have also been an issue for some of our trucks.” Cisneros said the project was not without its chal-


lenges. Crews had to dig around fi ve water lines and one electric line. “Everyone pitched in,” said Cisneros. “T ey dug,


cleaned, picked rock, stacked rock and loaded rock,” said Cisneros. “T is is not the Rocky Mountains, but we could


have re-created them with all that rock. T e weather was perfect and employees enjoyed good conversations during a day of very rewarding work.”


boost. Loose siding and trim boards were reattached and overgrown shrubs were removed from the land- scaping. Supplies for the project, including 14 gallons of


Packaging wine for shipment


paint, were furnished by the thankful town. “T e town is grateful for all the work at both


parks,” remarked Dee Ann Grapevine, both a trustee for the town and an co-op employee. “We don’t have the staff to perform all the work that was needed, so we were excited that REC employees were willing to volun- teer.”


Added Grapevine: “T ese parks are used by many


people from surrounding communities. It will be very nice to see the response when people come to watch their children and grandchildren play ball.” Grapevine echoed the sentiments of many other


employees who said the day was rewarding. “To see how nice things looked when we were


done was refreshing. All the old paint is new again,” she said. “It was an awesome day. Our employees worked very hard, got a lot done and I would like to personally thank them all for a job well done.” >>


Wine storage inside the winery


January 2014 - 5


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