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■ farm and garden january


Best days according to Moon phases.


Best planting days Above ground crops . . .


Root crops . . . . . . . . . . . . Seed beds . . . . . . . . . . . . Kill plant pests . . . . . . . . .


Best fishing days  Best . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


 Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Poor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


1-2, 5-6, 9-11, 14 15-16, 22-25, 28-29 14-16, 24-25


No good days. Folksy Tips, Hints & Wisdom


Caring for Injured Trees Experts agree—don’t top that tree!


5-6, 14-16, 4, 24-25


3, 9-13, 17-21, 30-31 1-2, 7-8, 22-23, 26-29


Best days to do other stuff Begin diet to gain weight . . . . . . . . . . . .


Begin diet to lose weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . Begin logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breed animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Make sauerkraut, can, or pickle . . . . . . . Cut hair to discourage growth . . . . . . . . Cut hair to encourage growth . . . . . . . . Cut hay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Destroy pests and weeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . End projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Go camping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graft or pollinate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harvest above ground vegetables . . . . Harvest below ground vegetables . . . . Go to the dentist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plant above ground vegetables . . . . . . . Plant below ground vegetables . . . . . . . Prune to discourage growth . . . . . . . . . . Prune to encourage growth . . . . . . . . . . Quit smoking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Set posts or pour concrete . . . . . . . . . . . Start projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wean animals and children . . . . . . . . . . .


he December ice storm dealt a heavy hand to southeast Oklahoma trees. Many homeowners may wonder if their tree, or trees, can be saved. According to the Arbor Foundation, the answer depends on the degree of damage.


T


5, 9, 14 19, 24


1, 28-29 24-25 24-25 22-23


4-5, 9-10 7-8 7-8


29-30 26-27 14-15 9-10


19-20 19-20


5-6, 14-15 24-25 26-27 7-8


19, 24


1, 28-29 2-3


19, 24 —from the Old Farmer’s Almanac


If there is minimal damage or if the structural integrity of the tree is still intact, the tree has a good chance of surviving. If there is heavy damage to the trunk or the root structure, or if the tree has lost more than one-third of its branches, it should be removed for safety reasons.


If you plan on removing trees yourself, use extreme caution. If a tree can’t be removed safely, or is located near electric lines or equipment, hire a professional tree service; preferably one with a certified arborist on staff and the knowledge, training and equipment to properly remove storm-damaged trees.


Be very careful about hiring strangers that arrive on your doorstep with a couple of chainsaws and great offer. Often they aren’t properly trained and don’t have insurance to cover any damage they might cause. If they offer to “top” your tree, kindly bid them farewell.


A topped tree is one where the main branches of the trees


10 | january 2014


are cut back to stubs. This non-professional practice is not only ugly, it causes weakly-attached limbs to grow back that are usually taller than the previous limbs. Because they lack strength, they have an even greater chance of falling during future storms and causing more damage.


Trees need to be pruned with their natural structural mechanisms taken into consideration. Limbs need to be pruned outside the branch collar, which is the swollen or raised area where the branch and trunk of the tree connect. Proper cuts will allow the tree to heal quicker and to lessen the chance of decay.


Before you fire up a chainsaw, please read “Managing Storm Damaged Trees,” available from the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service at http://www. hortla.okstate.edu/pdf/ storm_damaged_trees.pdf. You just might save that tree.


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