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Developments around Lake Eufaula are Booming


Bob Roberts, Falcon Tree Development owner, has been developing lots on Lake Eufaula since 2002. All photos by Cathey Heddlesten


Falcon Tree Development currently offers 40 lots with waterfront views. By Cathey Heddlesten L


ong considered one of southeastern Oklahoma’s most popular attractions, scenic Lake Eufaula in Kiamichi Electric Cooperative’s service territory is experiencing a booming development of both vacation getaways and full- time residential homes. More people are relocating to the popular recreation


area once known as a favorite hiding spot of famous Old West outlaws like Belle Starr and the James-Younger Gang.


“It is great to see all the growth in the Lake Eufaula area,” says Jim Jackson, CEO


of Wilburton-based Kiamichi Electric Cooperative (KEC), Inc. “Not only are people moving to one of the most peaceful and scenic areas of Oklahoma, but the housing developments here are also creating numerous jobs in the area. In the last two years alone, there have been more than 120 accounts added to this part of KEC’s service territory.”


Some of the area’s new residents have chosen to buy spacious lake lots and build their dream home or a weekend cabin to escape the pressures of big city life at one of the Falcon Tree Development lots while others have elected to become part of a newly formed small community called Carlton Landing.


Carlton Landing, a planned community, strives to offer the quality and simplicity of small town life.


Steve Winner, residential sales director for Carlton Landing, shows the new lakefront community with 1,650 acres in Pittsburg County.


Falcon Tree Development Bob Roberts, owner of Falcon Tree Development, has been developing lots on Lake Eufaula since April 2002 when he “retired and went to work,” helping people realize their dream of living near the water. Roberts works out of his small offi ce, with a sweeping panoramic view of Gaines Creek, in the home he built in 1998 with his late wife, Ruth. But you won’t often fi nd him shuffl ing papers around on his desk. Roberts is a hands-on guy and loves nothing more than spending his days operating backhoes and other heavy equipment to create home sites for new residents. During the past 11 years, more than 40 custom homes have been built in Roberts’ various housing developments—all named after the falcons he spots in the area. Falcons are known for their thin, tapered wings that enable them to fl y at high speeds and to rapidly change direction. Roberts says he enjoys watching the falcons fl y and always makes an extra effort to preserve those trees where the raptors have built their nests. The Falcon Ridge, Falcon Cove I and II, and Falcon View developments are lo- cated in the Gaines Creek area near Longtown, a small community outside of Eufaula in northern Pittsburg County. The developments offer a combined 112 lots total, with only about a dozen lots remaining in all of the additions. However, newer developments offer more housing opportunities. Phase I of Roberts’ newest development, Falcon Tree, has 78 lots available for custom-built homes, some with lake frontage and the majority offering at least a view of Longtown Creek. The Falcon Tree development encompasses approximately 120 acres, and lots in the addition range in size from one-half to one acre with a starting price around $35,000. Roberts says 40 of the lots are waterfront properties. Phase II of the Falcon Tree development, which will include lots that are larger in size, are expected to be ready for buyers in late 2014. Roberts credits his good working relationships with the First National Bank of


McAlester and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for his success in the development business. He works with Corps representatives to develop the land in accordance with wildlife management plans, allowing plenty of undisturbed areas to remain open as habitat for the area’s abundant populations of deer, turkey and other wildlife.


24 WWW.OK-LIVING.COOP


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