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Unclutter kitchen countertops for cleaner look, more space


5. You probably have a few items that you use in the kitchen every day and want to keep “out” to save time, like a juicer, a toaster or a napkin holder, for instance. Those few must-haves are the things that will “live” on the countertop out in the open—and that’s it. 6. Promise yourself that you will not leave anything else on your countertop. If you use your electric fry pan once a month, put it away when you’re finished. If the food processor comes out only when company’s coming over, use it and then tuck it into it’s hid- ing place as soon as the meal is prepared. 7. Designate one drawer as a catch-all where you can hide paper, gadgets and junk out of the way in a hurry if you need to. Clean out that junk drawer at least once a month so it won’t overflow onto the countertop. Once you declutter your countertops, your kitchen will look


cleaner and more inviting, and you’ll have more room for what your kitchen is really for—cooking and eating.


If it seems your cluttered kitchen countertops are covered with glue—because anything and everything seems to stick to them—it might be time to take drastic action. Take a good look at what’s taking up the precious space


that you wish you could use for meal prep instead of for storing everything from countertop appliances to unpaid bills, and take action to clear it off and keep it open. Here’s how: 1. Remove every item from every countertop in your kitchen. While the space is empty, thoroughly clean and dry the counter- top surfaces. 2. Resolve to keep only two kinds of items on your kitchen coun- tertop: small appliances that you use daily, and decorative items that you want to display permanently as part of your kitchen’s décor. Return those things—and there will be few of them—to their places. 3. Now, you’ve got a pile of stuff on your kitchen table that used to be on your countertops. Go through that pile and ask yourself three questions about each item: 1. Have I used this in the past month? 2. Is this an item that I can use only in the kitchen? 3. Do I even want or need to keep this anywhere for any reason? 4. Items in the pile that you don’t want or need get tossed in the trash, given to someone who doesn’t live with you or do- nated. Then, sort through the pile that doesn’t need to be in the kitchen, and find another place elsewhere in the house to keep it. For the things that you need in the kitchen but not very often— like the rice steamer and waffle iron—find a storage space in a cabinet, in a closet or on a shelf. Up high or in the back is OK, as you won’t be retrieving them on a regular basis.


Huge Upgrade Update


Dover substation conversion is underway.


Over 30 trucks will be at the Dover substation this week as the 138Kv conversion is getting closer to completion. After getting all circuits back fed from the Twin Lakes and the Hennessey substations, the old 69Kv transformer and buss works will be removed. The new 138kv completed substation will then be energized and new communications em- ployed. The Twin Lakes / OGE switch station is not yet available for our use in emergencies. Additional 138Kv upgrades are underway for the switch station. This Huge Upgrade Project has been in the works for over two years.


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