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Cooking up Thanksgiving savings M


ANY will enjoy a delicious, home-cooked dinner this Thanksgiving, surrounded by loved ones eager to share in the celebration of the season. Here is a fact you may find interesting as you begin your holiday meal- planning: Did you know that cooking accounts for 4.5% of total energy use in U.S. homes? That figure doesn’t include the energy associated with refrigeration, hot water heating and dishwashing. Added together, as much as 15% of the energy used in the average American home is used in the kitchen.


This holiday season, Northeast Oklahoma Electric Cooperative would like to share six ways for you to reduce unnecessary energy use while still enjoying all of your family’s favorite dishes. Don’t peek—When using the oven, it’s tempting to open the door frequently to check


on a dish’s progress. Because the hot air that is contained in the oven is an important part of the appliance’s cooking process, frequent peeking is self-defeating. Every time the oven door is opened, the temperature inside is reduced by as much as 25 degrees, forcing it to work even harder (and use more energy) to restore the proper cooking temperature. If you need to check on a dish, use the oven window instead. Turn it down or turn it off—For regular cooking, it’s probably not


necessary to have your oven on as long—or set as high—as the recipe calls for. For recipes that need to bake for longer than an hour, pre-heating the oven isn’t always necessary. And if your stovetop or oven is electric, you can usually turn it off 5-10 minutes before the dish should be done and the residual heat will finish the job. Just remember to keep the oven door closed or the lid on until time is up. Alternately, if you’re baking in a ceramic or glass dish, you can typically set your oven for 25 degrees less than the recipe calls for. Since ceramic and glass hold heat better than metal pans, your dish will cook just as well at a lower temperature.


Give your burners a break—If you have an electric stovetop with those shiny metal reflectors underneath the burners, you probably gnash your teeth over cleaning them. However, for your stovetop to function effectively, it’s important that those reflectors stay free of dirt and grime. If your reflectors are of the less expensive variety, next time they need cleaning you may consider replacing them. But don’t skimp—the better reflectors on the market can not only decrease stovetop cooking times, but also save energy in the process.


Don’t neglect your crock pot—Or your microwave, toaster oven, or warming plate. Most of us have a veritable smorgasbord of small kitchen cooking appliances that we rarely use. Putting them to work more often instead of the oven or stovetop can mean significant energy savings. For example, the average toaster oven can use up to half the energy of the average electric stove over the same cooking time.


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Northeast Connection is published monthly as an effective means of communicating news, information and innovative thinking that enhances the profitability and quality of life for members of Northeast Oklahoma Electric Cooperative.


Please direct all editorial inquiries to Communications Specialist Clint Branham at 800-256-6405 ext. 9340 or email clint.branham@neelectric.com.


Vinita headquarters: Four and a half miles east of Vinita on Highway 60/69 at 27039 South 4440 Road.


Grove office: 212 South Main.


Business hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Offices are closed Saturday, Sunday and holidays.


A representative is available 24 hours at: 1-800-256-6405


If you experience an outage, please check your switch or circuit breaker in the house and on the meter pole to be sure the trouble is not on your side of the service. If you contact us to report service issues or discuss your account, please use the name as it appears on your bill, and have both your pole number and account number ready.


Officers and Trustees of NEOEC, Inc. President Dandy Allan Risman


Vice President John L. Myers


Secretary-Treasurer Benny L. Seabourn


Harold W. Robertson Member


Sharron Gay


Member James A. Wade


Member Bill R. Kimbrell


Member Jack Caudill Member


Asst. Secretary-Treasurer Everett L. Johnston


District 5 District 4 District 2 District 3 District 1 District 6 District 7 District 8 District 9


NEOEC Management Team Anthony Due General Manager


Larry Cisneros, P.E. Manager of Engineering Services


Susanne Frost


Manager of Office Services Cindy Hefner


Manager of Public Relations Connie Porter


Manager of Financial Services Rick Shurtz


Manager of Operations November 2012


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