This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Page 2 C A N A D I A N V A L L E Y


P.O. Box 751 Seminole, Okla. 74818 Serving Hughes, Lincoln, McIntosh, Okfuskee, Pottawatomie, Seminole and portions of Oklahoma, Cleveland and Creek counties


ELECTRALITE By George cont.


Main Office and Headquarters Interstate 40 at the Prague/Seminole Exit


Area Office


35 W JC Watts Street, Eufaula Office Hours


8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday -Friday Board of Trustees


President— Yates Adcock, Dustin.............................District 8 Vice President — Joe Semtner, Konawa ..................District 6 Secretary-Tres.—Robert Schoenecke, Meeker .........District 2 Asst. Sec/Treas. — Steve Marak, Konawa ...............District 1 ...........................................District 4


Clayton Eads, Shawnee


Gary Crain, Prague.....................................................District 3 Matt Goodson, Tecumseh...........................................District 5 J.P. Duvall, Seminole .................................................District 7 George E Hand .....................................................Manager J. Roger Henson ....................................................Attorney Ann Weaver ...........................................................Editor


Telephone Numbers


Seminole .........................................................(405) 382-3680 Shawnee, Tecumseh, Earlsboro ......................(405) 273-4680 Toll free.............................................................(877)382-3680 Eufaula ........................................................... (918) 689-3232


Read


Cycle 1 Cycle 2 Cycle 3


26th-31st 6th-11th 16th-21st


In Case of Trouble


1. Check for blown fuse or tripped circuit breakers. 2. Check with your neighbors. Ask if their electricity is off and if they have reported it.


3. If not call the office and report the trouble.


Operating Statistics for August 2011


Operating Revenues .......................... Wholesale Cost of Power .................. Percentage WPC is of Revenue .................. Revenue Per Mi of Line: MTD ............. $1,161.02 Consumers per mile of line:MTD .................. 4.58 KWPeak Demand -This Month ................ 165,676 Billing KW Demand ..................................110,748 KW Peak Demand: YTD .......................... 165,676 KWH Purchased - This Month ............. 79,215,980 Taxes Paid ............................................... $122,183 Interest on Long Term Debt ................... $189,330 System Load Factor ......................................


$6,000.143 $4,378,243 72.97


64.3 2012


$5,627,847 $3,891,637


69.15


$1,086.25 4.60


159,026 115,112 160,468


73,057,990 $120,205 $186,068 61.7


New Services Staked in September During the month of September 95 new services were


staked. The total new services staked in 2012 is 915. This compares to 610 for the same period in 2011.


Billing date 5th


15th 25th


1-1/2% penalty is applied 20


after billing date


I do have a point and plan on tying this issue back to the elec- tric utility business. Recently the Department of Energy issued a proposed plan to do away with electric hot water heaters. I think the theory is that electric water heaters are not efficient enough; there- fore too much CO2 is being emitted at the electric generating plants. The conclusion must be that it is better to have hot water heaters emitting CO2 in multiples (each household) as opposed to having the CO2 emitted at a point source (generating station). This is where theoretically, not really today, you could control or capture the CO2. (What if that electricity used by the electric hot water heater came from a wind or solar farm)? That logic is hard to consistently follow with the decision of the government to encourage electric cars which will take electricity from the same generating plant, causing more CO2 to be emitted at the generating plant, than at the individual car with a combustion engine. The purposes of these two initiatives seem to have the opposite effect.


Here is next great plan from central. Let’s do away with conven- tional light bulbs that use too much electricity and replace them with more efficient bulbs. The options would be florescent bulbs or Light Emitting Diodes (LED). These bulbs cost several times as much as conventional light bulbs. This is not a totally bad idea. I have replaced many of the light bulbs in my home with florescent bulbs or LED’s. I have several light bulbs that are very seldom turned on and used only for short periods of time. NO matter how much the bulbs cost, the efficiency does not count when the bulb is turned off. However, the government plans to make these cheaper conventional bulbs unavailable. 1006291300


We continue to promote ethanol made from corn to burn in our cars. It requires a subsidy from tax dollars to be produced. pears there is no reduction in CO2 emissions from the total lifecycle of ethanol production or overall energy efficiency. Some engines will not run on the ethanol. Mileage is less. And since we are in ef- fect burning corn, we are driving up the cost of food for people here and around the world.


It ap-


I remember in the 1970’s when the government passed laws not only to stop the building of new natural gas generating plants, but required those in existence be shut down by a certain date. Across the nation electric utilities raced to build coal-fired generating plants that were unneeded to meet customer demand for electricity but required under the “no-gas” mandate. Customers have been paying twice for the capacity under that mandate. Now we have the same government trying to shut down those same coal plants. Whatever takes their place will have an additional cost for consumers. I am not a “no regulation” advocate. I don’t pretend to know everything about any issue. But inconsistent central planning for a utility system does not work. If we as a nation decide that burning coal is bad, then set the regulations so that no new coal-fired gen- erating plants can be built or limit the emissions for all new plants. But customers cannot afford to continue to pay to pile more and more costs on the consumer to change and change generating plants. These retroactive regulations will place a greater burden on the poor and middle class than that proposed in the income tax laws by either political party.


To make this work the government will have to grant individu- als the right to print our own money. It has worked for them so far. That statement was unnecessary; however the cost of energy impacts the cost of everything.


I believe that the cost of energy is the biggest variable or obstacle in reviving our economy.


The ElectraLite


NOVEMBER 2012


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144