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KS&A Orchards


American Scents


High Brass Hunting Preserve


“I asked Lee if you could milk sheep and we started milking them to make sheep’s-milk soap,” Kim McGarr said.


One day, while making soap, they allowed the milk to sit for too long and it set up into curds. Rather than throwing it away, they decided to inject it with cheese mold and try to make blue cheese. Today KS&A Orchards is one of only four Grade-A sheep dairies in the country and blue cheese has become their main product. “We’re the only company in Oklahoma to make our cheese out of sheep’s milk,” Lee McGarr said. “We only make one variety of cheese but we do it very well.”


In fact, the McGarrs have won international awards for their cheese, which lacks the bitter af- tertaste present in store-bought blue cheese. In addition to cheese, KS&A Orchards produces pecans, wood products such as cheese boards and cheese boxes, and sheep’s milk soap. Their gift bas- kets make great holiday presents. KS&A Orchards’ blue cheese is available at specialty cheese shops in Oklahoma and Texas; all products are avail- able online at http://www.ksaorchards.com or by phone at 580-439-2751.


M/E Iron Works


What started as a hobby for Matt Piearcy of Crescent has become a full-time operation. Run by Matt and his wife, Eva, Cimarron Electric Coop- erative members, M/E Iron Works creates custom steel products.


“We started selling our products at horse and farm shows. Now it’s all we do,” Matt Piearcy said. “We’ve be doing it full time for about 14 years.” M/E Iron Works built some of the gates for Boone Pickens Stadium in Stillwater and they have a booth at OSU football games. They also created a custom entry gate and headboard for the Skaggs family of Lexington, featured on Extreme Makeover Home Edition.


Their smaller items make great gifts: car tags, wedding plaques, light fi xtures, fi re pits, OU and OSU items, home décor, names, 3D signs, and more. All M/E Iron Works products are computer- cut, powder-coated and can be made in any color. “We do a lot of custom work,” Piearcy said. “If you can dream it up, we can do it.”


A small company “in the middle of nowhere,” M/E Iron Works has customers throughout Unit- ed States and even outside the country, Piearcy


16 OKLAHOMA LIVING


said. For more information visit http://www. meironworks.com or call 405-969-3267.


Summerside Vineyards Winery & Meadery Having traveled to northern California during grape-harvest season, Northeast Oklahoma Elec- tric Cooperative members Gary and Marsha Butler were inspired to turn four acres of empty prairie grass on Grand Lake into a vineyard. Today, run- ning Summerside Vineyards Winery & Meadery is a full-time operation for the Butlers. “We’ve grown quite a bit in 10 years,” Gary But-


ler said. “We sold over 4,000 cases of wine last year.”


Summerside Vineyards produces a wide variety of wines—both red and white, from dry to sweet. They grow three varieties of grapes in their vine- yard and the rest are purchased locally. “Everyone’s tastes are different. We offer a vari- ety so that everyone can fi nd something they en- joy,” Butler said.


One of their most popular wines is their Cream Sherry, which has won five international gold medals, two of which were “double golds”—the best out of the gold medal winners. Located on Route 66 in Vinita, guests can tour Summerside’s winery, sample wines in the tasting room and enjoy lunch in the Bistro. Those look- ing for a unique Christmas gift are sure to fi nd it. “Wine is a perfect gift for the holidays,” Butler said. “You can’t give wine that people won’t enjoy.” For more information visit http://www.sum- mersidevineyards.com or call 888-508-9463.


Wolf Creek Mini Mall “If you can’t fi nd it at Wolf Creek Mini Mall, it’s not to be found,” said Tommie Anderson. A Tri-County Electric Cooperative member, Anderson is one of the vendors at the Wolf Creek Mini Mall in Guymon.


The former owner of Granny’s Attic in Guymon, Anderson sold the business to current owners Joh- nita and Bobby Gloden of Hough, also Tri-County Electric Cooperative members.


“The variety of items that can be found here is what makes us unique,” Anderson said. From new items to antiques, Wolf Creek Mini Mall has something for everyone: jewelry, purses, luggage, men’s items, metalwork, benches, signs, home décor, furniture, baby clothing and collect- ibles. The six-room store offers gifts for all ages,


Christian Cheese


for both men and women. Those needing a quick Christmas gift are sure to fi nd what they’re look- ing for—and have it gift wrapped for free. Melyn Johnson, director of Main Street Guy- mon, said Wolf Creek Mini Mall is her favorite place to shop.


“It’s eclectic and fun—an adventure every time you go in,” Johnson said. “And it’s the friendliest service you can ever get.”


For more information about Wolf Creek Mini Mall, visit https://www.facebook.com/wolfcreek. minimall or call 580-338-6464.


Zena Suri Alpacas


For Kathleen Callan, alpaca ranching is the ful- fi llment of a lifelong dream.


“In second grade I wrote a report about alpacas. After that, I always wanted to raise them,” Callan said.


Four years ago, Kathleen and her husband, Tom, moved from Utah to Oklahoma. The Northeast


Bradley Pottery


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