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Edwin and Amie Taylor, Oklahoma Electric Cooperative members, shop in downtown Purcell. Photo by James Pratt


By Laura Araujo W


ith Christmas just around the corner, shoppers have an important decision to make—where to spend their money. For local business owner, Kathleen Callan of Zena Suri Alpacas, located in Zena, it’s an easy de- cision: buy locally.


“When people patronize their friends and neigh- bors, their friends and neighbors patronize them right back,” she said. “If someone comes into my shop and spends some money, I’ll most likely go into a shop down the street and spend some of it.” Shopping locally stimulates the state’s economy and keeps local businesses going.


According to Jana Hallman of Owasso, owner of Ashton Kelly Candles, many Oklahomans are al- ready choosing to keep their business local. “When people fi nd out our candles are made in Oklahoma, they tell us how glad they are. Oklaho- mans want to support Oklahomans,” she said. And one thing’s for sure—Oklahomans have a lot to offer one another. From made-in-Oklahoma food items to custom metal products and hunting packages, local businesses across the state offer a unique variety of gifts to make Christmas shopping easier this year.


American Scents


Last summer, Deana Adair went shopping to buy a gift for a friend. She was looking for something


14 OKLAHOMA LIVING


made in the United States, but noticed that most of the products she picked up were made abroad. “My experience inspired me to open a ‘Made in the USA’ gift store,” she said. “Americans make great products, and I wanted to showcase them.” Having worked in retail for 25 years, Adair took a break from her corporate retail job to open Ameri- can Scents gifts, located in the Elk Plaza shopping center off Highway 81 in Duncan.


The shop offers everything from local art and home décor to food products, pet items, toys and Made-in-Oklahoma gifts. A variety of domestic candies make great stocking stuffers; she also sells locally made Christmas ornaments.


And Adair adheres strictly to her made-in-the- U.S.-only policy.


“I received some t-shirts that were printed in the United States but weren’t actually made in the U.S.,” she said. “I also received some bubble gum that was made in Mexico. I had to ship them both back”


As a Co-op Connections Partner, American Scents provides electric co-op members a 10-percent dis- count. More than that, they will fi nd friendly cus- tomer service and unique, high-quality products. For more information, visit https://www.facebook. com/AmericanScents or call 580-475-0055.


Ashton Kelly Candles


Jana Hallman was a loyal Ashton Kelly Candles customer for many years. So when she retired from a career in nursing administration, she took up a


new one. “I used the product for years and I loved it, so in 2010 I bought the company,” Hallman said. Ashton Kelly Candle specializes in high-quality, hand-poured candles. “My candles appeal to people who like highly fragranced candles,” Hallman said. “I do a lot of fragrance blending—they’re not the run-of-the-mill fragrances.”


In addition to a full line of candles, Hallman sells reed diffusers, room sprays, fragrance beads and wax melts for candle warmers. For Christmas she offers custom, hand-made gift baskets and en- joys helping customers choose fragrances to give as gifts.


“I encourage clients not to purchase Christmas scents as Christmas gifts because on the morning of the 26th they’ll put them away,” Hallman said. Ashton Kelly Candles are available at various Oklahoma retailers, Tulsa and Oklahoma State Fairs, An Affair of the Heart shows, online at http:// www.ashtonkellys.com or by calling 918-376-4595. A third-generation Oklahoma cattle rancher, Hallman and her husband Dewayne also run a ranch in Bristow. They are Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative members.


Bradley’s Pottery


It all began with dirt—red dirt that is. When potter Julie Bradley’s husband discovered a large vein of Oklahoma clay in their back yard, a business was born. Bradley developed a method of


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