This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
 An important message from the Federal Trade Commission Fall into Energy


Savings  As scarves and light jackets


  with these seasonal tips:


Set your thermostat no higher 


lower the temperature when you  saves money and keeps you warm.


During the day, open shades and curtains to allow solar heating.


Close them at night to retain the day’s heat.


Check your home’s weather stripping for air leaks around


 and wherever pipes, wires, and  the warm air you paid for won’t escape.


Have your heating system 


through the North American  program.


 once every three months. Clean


 heating season to keep the system at peak performance.


Want more home energy


  at www.TogetherWeSave.com.


Source: Touchstone Energy® Cooperatives. Madeline Keimig writes on consumer and cooperative affairs for Touchstone Energy® Cooperatives, the national branding program for 700-plus electric cooperatives in the U.S.


12


Shopping for New Windows?


If you're thinking about replacing windows in your home, the


choices you make about style, materials, and installation could have a big impact on your energy bill. Here are some things to consider.


Choosing YourWindows Materials


Cost


Price per window ranges from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars, depending on materials, features, and installation costs.


Glazing & Glass Technologies


Some glazes and glass provide better insulation, light, and condensation


resistance. Windows with low-emissivity (low-e) coatings often are more energy efficient.


Wood frames offer good insulation, but are heavy and high-maintenance. Vinyl-frames insulate well and don't need painting.


Cleaning & Maintenance


Some materials and features make windows easier to care for. Tilt-in sashes, for example, make cleaning easier.


Style


Single-hung, double-hung, and sliding windows leak more air than casement, awning, and hopper windows.


Installation


If windows aren't installed according to manufacturer's instructions, you might not get the savings or comfort expected.


An Energy-Rating Label to Help You Shop Look for the National Fenestration RatingCouncil’s labelwhen youshop.


U-factor: Rates how much heat


escapes through a window; most important in cold climates.


Range: 0.2 — 1.2 Visible


Transmittance Rates how much light comes in.


Range: 0 — 1


Condensation Resistance Rates how well a product resists condensation.


Range: 1 — 100


Air Leakage Rates how much outside air comes in.


Range: 0.1 — 0.3


= ratings may not be on the label, but may be online or from the vendor


Solar Heat Gain


Coefficient: Rates how much heat from the sun is allowed in. This is most important in warm climates.


Range: 0 — 1


For more information


visit energysavers.gov or efficientwindows.org


2012


www.okcoop.org


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