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Powerline Press November 2012


A Supplement of Oklahoma Living Published by Lake Region Electric Cooperative for its members. Vol. 3


 Tip of the Month


Your kitchen can yield big energy savings. Check the refrigerator  Run only full dish- washer loads, and use the microwave rather than oven to reheat food and make small meals. Finally, unplug small appliances when not in use—many draw power even when turned off.


Source: U.S. Department of Energy


Finding the Value of Electricity


Cell phones and personal digital devices are a part of our culture. Everyone, it seems, is con- nected on the go, whether they are just making phone calls, text messaging, or checking e-mail. Such communication freedom is a luxury we pay for, generally without grumbling.


So why is it that when it comes to electricity, a necessity in our modern world, many people complain when the electric bill comes every month? We expect electricity to be there at the - gry or frustrated.


Over the past years, gasoline has gone up. A loaf of white bread has risen 3.73 percent annu- ally, and a dozen eggs jumped 7.39 percent last year.


 LREC will be closed November 22nd & 23rd in observance of Thanksgiving.


Electricity with Lake Region Electric Coop- erative (LREC) costs .08 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh) during the summer and .06 cents per kilo- watt hour (kWh) during the winter and has re- mained unchanged since February 2009. When you consider how reliable electricity is, the value goes up even more.


Nearly a third of all U.S. households have four electronic devices, such as cell phones,


plugged in and charging, according to the Resi- dential Energy Consumption Survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. In the past 30 years, the amount of residential electricity used by appliances and electronics has increased from 17 percent to 31 percent. More homes than ever use major appliances and central air conditioning. Digital video recorders (DVRs), computers, and multiple televisions have become the norm. Clearly, our appetite for electricity shows no  switch, use your toaster, or run your washing ma- chine, remember the value electricity holds. Lake Region Electric Cooperative is looking out for you by working together to keep electric bills afford- able, controlling costs through innovation, and 


Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics & EIA’s Residential Energy Consumption Survey


Keep POWER POLES


A wooden power pole may seem like a great place to put up a sign, but it is dangerous to line workers who have to climb the pole. Staples, tacks, or nails used to attach signs can hinder a line worker, or pierce the worker’s safety equipment, possibly resulting in electrocution. Attachments to poles also damage poles and reduce their life.


LREC Powerline Press 1


NEWSLETTER No. 11


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