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Zena Suri Alpacas


Ashton Kelly Candles


M/E Iron Works Photos by Laura Araujo, JuliAnn Graham, James Pratt and courtesy photos of local businesses


using clay from the ground to make unique pot- tery items.


“I love working with Oklahoma clay,” Bradley said. “People get a kick out of the fact that dirt from the yard they’ve always hated can be pretty.” She forms the Oklahoma earth into fl owerpots, vases, dinnerware, wall hangings and custom piec- es. One of Bradley’s newest pursuits is sculpting Oklahoma landmarks, including the Phillips 66 gas station on Route 66 in Chandler, where she lives. For Christmas, her gingerbread men and cross ornaments are popular gifts.


“It’s nice to give someone a small gift that has to do with Oklahoma—and since they’re small they’re not expensive,” Bradley said.


She stamps the back of each hand-made piece with the words, “Oklahoma Red Clay, Route 66” and 6.6 percent of her proceeds go to Route 66 preservation.


Bradley’s red-clay pottery is available through her website, http://www.bradleyspottery.com, by call- ing 405-258-7193 and at the American Scents gift shop in Duncan.


Christian Cheese


Declining milk prices were a blessing in disguise for Kingfi sher dairy farmers George and LaWanna Christian. After 37 years in the dairy business, the Cimarron Electric Cooperative members started making cheese.


“We used to milk 150 cows and we had hired some Mennonites to help,” George Christian said. “One day they told us they could make cheese so we started making it.” The company they were selling milk to told them


to quit making cheese or they would cancel their contract. Christian didn’t stop making cheese and the contract was canceled. However, the risk paid off. Fifteen years later, Christian Cheese is sold in 40 stores in Oklahoma, in OSU’s football stadium, at Oklahoma Thunder games, and has even been featured on the Food


Network’s “Food Finds” television program. “I think people enjoy our cheese,” Christian said. “We don’t ever have to go look for customers—they come to us.”


Christian Cheese produces 35 different fl avors of cheddar; among them: traditional, Blazing Cajun, Cowboy Cheddar and an array of wine cheddars made with Oklahoma wine. Their samplers, featur- ing nine varieties of cheese, make great Christmas gifts.


Christian Cheese can be found at various Okla- homa grocery stores, through the Oklahoma Food Co-op, online at http://www.christiancheese.com or by calling toll free: 888-437-0018.


High Brass Hunting Preserve


For all of the hard-to-shop for men out there, High Brass Hunting Preserve in Choctaw Coun- ty offers bird-hunting packages that are sure to please. Owners Bucky and Carolynn Beason, Choc- taw Electric Cooperative members, raise their own quail, chukar and pheasant.


“We treat the hunters as family,” Carolynn Bea- son said. “They come as friends and leave as fam- ily.”


Hunters arrive in time for dinner and enjoy an evening around the campfi re; afterwards they bunk in one of the preserve’s cabins. In the morning, they’re sent off with a hot breakfast to spend time in the fi eld with a hunting guide and dogs. After lunch at the lodge, they head back into the fi eld for cleanup.


The meals, homemade by Beason herself, are one of the highlights of the experience.


“One hunter from Louisiana said he didn’t care if he didn’t fi re a shot—the food was worth the trip,” Beason said.


High Brass Hunting Preserve offers special pack- ages for children; families are encouraged to visit during Christmas vacation.


As a Co-op Connections Partner, electric coop- erative members receive a 10-percent discount at


High Brass Hunting Preserve. For more informa- tion visit http://www.highbrasshunting.com or call 580-326-7759.


Kokopelli Village Antiques & Collectibles Collecting antiques has been a long-time hobby for Cimarron Electric members Larry and Linda Wilcox. However, selling them is a new venture. The grand opening of Kokopelli Village Antiques & Collectibles in downtown Guthrie took place on October 6, 2012. “We started out as collectors and acquired too much, so we decided to open the business,” Linda Wilcox said.


Customers will experience the difference of shop- ping locally when they step into the store and are greeted by Larry or Linda.


“People have told us they experience a warm, welcoming atmosphere when they come in,” Linda Wilcox said. “We enjoy working with our custom- ers.”


The store, which boasts two stories of antiques,


features higher-end collectibles including furni- ture, glass, painted ponies, Western art, Native American items, and more.


“We like the unusual,” Wilcox said. “You can fi nd things here that aren’t in everyone’s store.” Some of their unique pieces include a glass statue of expectant parents, an up-close look at which re- veals a baby in the womb of the mother; a green, Depression glass toy washing machine; and a Rol- monica player harmonic that plays rolls of music when the user blows into it.


For more information visit http://www.kokopel- livillage.net or call 405-282-7159.


KS&A Orchards


Cotton Electric members Lee and Kim McGarr began making award-winning cheese by accident. In 2000 they started a pecan orchard near Co- manche and they purchased some sheep to graze between the trees.


NOVEMBER 2012 15


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