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NOVEMBER 2012 LET’S SAVE ENERGY TOGETHER


part of our culture. Everyone, it seems, is connected on the go—whether they’re just making phone calls, text messaging, or checking e-mail. Such communication freedom is a luxury we pay for, generally without grumbling.


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So why is it that when it comes to electricity—a necessity in our modern world—many of us complain when the electric bill comes every month? We expect electricity to be there at the flip of the switch, and when it’s not, we get angry or frustrated.


Hey, I’m no different—I expect the lights to come on every time, too. And as a member of your co-op team, I share responsibility for making sure your electric service is safe, reliable, and affordable. But I also believe that when compared to other commodities, electricity remains a great value.


For example, over the past 10 years, gasoline has shot up 12.66 percent on average annually, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. A loaf of white bread rose 3.73 percent annually, and a dozen eggs jumped 7.39 percent per year.


In comparison, electricity has increased just 3.7 percent a year nationally for the past decade. When you consider how reliable electricity is, the value goes up even more. Choctaw Electric Cooperative members experience fewer and shorter outages than ever before—something


Finding the value of electricity BY JOHN DRAKE


owadays, cell phones and personal digital devices are a


cooperative energy auditor


we’re proud of, considering electricity is a 24-hour-a- day commodity. Of course, we’re working hard to reduce even those brief interruptions, increase our service reliability, and control costs through innovative technology.


Those cell phones I


mentioned earlier? Nearly a third of all U.S. households have four electronic devices, such as cell phones, plugged in and charging, according to the Residential Energy Consumption Survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. In the past 30 years, the amount of residential electricity used by appliances and electronics has increased from 17 percent to 31 percent. More homes than ever use major appliances and central air


PAGE 5 AARP DRIVER SAFETY TIP


conditioning. Digital video recorders (DVRs), computers, and multiple televisions are standard.


Clearly, our appetite for electricity shows no signs of slowing down. So the next time you flip a switch, use your toaster, or run your washing machine, remember the value electricity holds. And know that Choctaw Electric is looking out for you by working together to keep electric bills affordable, controlling costs through innovation, and putting you, our members, first.


To visit with a CEC energy use specialist about energy use, free energy audits or loans for energy efficient appliances, please contact John Drake or Mark Zachary at 800-780-6486, ext. 233.


Intersection Right of Way Tips


 Remember to scan or “keep the total traffic scene” in mind in order to allow for any side vision problems you have.


 If the light is green when you first see it, don’t assume it will be green when you get to the intersection. Be prepared to stop.


 Double-check cross traffic when approaching an intersection, especially one without traffic signals or stop or yield signs. Check left, right, and then left again. The first lane of traffic you cross is traffic coming from your left. Don’t be scared by vehicles behind you blowing their horns, don’t pull out or turn until YOU feel it is safe to do so.


 Always be prepared to stop at the first sign of a conflict.


 Always watch for pedestrians when approaching and crossing an intersection.


 As you approach an intersection, check your rearview mirror to see if the traffic behind you is stopping.


 While stopped at an intersection with a traffic light, observe other traffic, scan around your car and be ready to proceed when the light changes and if it is safe to do so.


 After stopping at an intersection, before proceeding, check left, right, and left again to spot possible red light runners.


 Carefully observe oncoming traffic for possible left turns in front of you. Do not endanger your safety by assuming others will yield the right- of-way.


CEC will host an AARP defensive driving class on November 7 and 28. Classes are free for veterans in November. To enroll, or to schedule an AARP driver safety class, please contact Brad Kendrick 800-780-6486, ext 248.


CEC


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