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Sport


Ade Adepitan


TV presenter; disability rights campaigner; Patron, Wheel Power


Ade is not only a legend of the wheelchair basketball court but more recently, he is known for being the face of the London 2012 Paralympics coverage. One of the main presenters for Channel 4’s live coverage of the Paralympic Games, his enthusiasm and personable nature quickly propelled him into the hearts of the nation. His dedication to disability sport has played a pivotal role in building the exposure and development of the Paralympic Games in London 2012. As an Ambassador for London’s 2012 Olympic bid, he sits on the advisory board of LOCOG and was also a consultant for Channel 4’s Paralympic coverage. Ade’s remarkable 18 years in wheelchair basketball saw him gain over 90 caps for Great Britain, with career highlights including winning a bronze medal at the 2004 Paralympic Games in Athens and gold at the 2005 Paralympic World Cup in Manchester. Since his retirement from the sport he has been competing in wheelchair tennis, completed the London Marathon as well as focusing on a successful television career. T e 39-year-old is committed to various charities and is the patron of the disability sport charity, Wheel Power, T e Association of Wheelchair Children and Scope, and is an ambassador for the NSPCC and T e Prince’s Trust.


Maggi Alphonsi


England rugby captain/ Divisional Talent Development Offi cer for London and the South East


Maggi is widely recognised as the best female rugby player in the world. T e England and Saracens fl anker has claimed honours at every level. In 2011 she became the fi rst woman to win the prestigious Rugby Union Writers’ Club Pat Marshall Award, following in the footsteps of England legends Martin Johnson, Jonny Wilkinson, Lawrence Dallaglio and Jason Robinson. In 2010 she beat off the likes of heptathlete Jessica Ennis and world champion gymnast Beth Tweddle to win a readers’ poll for the 2010 Sunday Times Sportswoman of the Year. T e 28-year- old, who amassed 63 caps for her country, is a trailblazer for women’s rugby. She has played in two Rugby World Cups (2006 and 2010), where England fi nished second to New Zealand on both occasions. In addition, she works as a divisional talent development offi cer for the RFU of Women, is a patron for the sporting equals organisation and an ambassador for the Injured Rugby Players Foundation. T e University of Bedfordshire has also awarded Maggi with an honorary doctoral degree for her services to women’s rugby. She was awarded an MBE for services to rugby.


Luol Deng


Captain, Chicago Bulls and Great Britain


Luol has the distinction of being cited by President Barack Obama as his favourite basketball player because of his work on and off the court. Luol won the 2006-2007 Golden Icon Award for Best Sports Role Model and the 2008 UN Refugee Agency’s Humanitarian of the Year award. He is a spokesperson for the World Food Programme, the largest humanitarian agency, and for every basket he shoots he donates $50 to ninemillion.org, the UN Refugee Agency’s campaign to help children refugees realise sporting and educational opportunities. His charity, the Luol Deng Foundation, does fantastic work in Africa, focusing on fi ghting poverty. On court he is just as impressive. His coach describes him as the glue of the team. T e 2010-2011 season was the best of Luol’s career; he didn’t miss a game and helped his team to achieve an incredible 62 wins and 20 losses. He went on to lead Team GB in the London 2012 Olympics to their fi rst Olympic basketball win since 1948. T e Sudanese ex-refugee, whose family fl ed to England and settled in London’s South Norwood, has replaced Michael Jordan as the Bulls’ iconic face. Luol’s annual basketball camp at Loughborough University is seen as one of Europe’s best.


Paul Elliott


Uefa CSR and Football Board Committee Member


Former footballers are oſt en content to fi ll their retirement with roles as pundits on radio and TV talk shows – not so Paul. T e former Charlton, Luton, Aston Villa, Pisa, Celtic and Chelsea defender has become one of the most respected voices in the game, but that’s because he’s chosen to stay involved at a political level. Paul works with the sport’s key authorities – the Premier League, the Football League and the Football Association – to ensure that they adhere to delivering and implementing race equality within the game at all levels. He is a special adviser to the Equality and Human Rights Commission and sat on the diversity and inclusion board for the London Olympic Organising Committee. In his fi nal season with Celtic he was named Scottish Footballer of the Year. In 2003 Paul was awarded an MBE for services to youth football and anti-racism initiatives. Paul works with FIFPro, the worldwide organisation for professional players, as a trustee for Kick It Out, football’s equality and inclusion drive. He was a awarded a CBE in the 2012 Birthday Honours for his services to equality and diversity in football – the fi rst black footballer to receive a CBE. As we went to press, Paul was being tipped to become the fi rst black chairman of a Football League club, with Charlton said to be lining him up for the position.


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