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Public Sector & T ird Sector


Dorothea Hodge


Founding Director, Aequitas Consulting


Dorothea runs Aequitas, an infl uential strategy, public policy and communications consultancy. In a career spanning over 15 years in politics and corporate communications, she has a formidable, track record. She is a former special adviser to the Leader of the House of Lords and has provided political counsel to many senior UK politicians including former prime minister Tony Blair and to Labour leader David Miliband, in addition to advising global brands such as Nokia. Dorothea’s House of Lords role meant she was responsible for brokering deals on legislation that included the Immigration and Asylum Act and the Mental Health Bill. With a strong focus on international relations, Dorothea has worked with global leaders such as Kofi Annan and has advised under- secretary general of the UN Valerie Amos in a private capacity for several years. In 2005 Dorothea ran Labour’s 35-strong general election media team, delivering frequent, high-profi le media events involving the prime minister and reporting directly to Alastair Campbell. Prior to her work in the government, Dorothea worked at leading consultancies Luther Pendragon and Cohn & Wolfe, advising clients such as O2, Deloitte & Touche, Diageo and Avaya.


Lurene Joseph


Chief Executive, Marketing Leeds


Lurene is chief executive of Marketing Leeds, an inward- investment and tourism group that drives jobs and skill creation in Leeds. In her previous role as chief executive of the now-closed London Development Agency, whose purpose was to drive the delivery of a range of London’s regeneration, skills and business projects, Lurene was at the heart of reshaping and rebuilding the LDA’s profi le and reputation during a period of increasing budgetary constraints. She was involved in a number of big projects, which include the London Olympics bid, Wembley’s regeneration, the Southbank’s accessibility and she also led the development opportunity for the Royal Docks, delivering thousands of jobs into London. Prior to the LDA, Lurene gained signifi cant experience working in large companies. At oil giant Shell she was responsible for brand and communications across Europe. She also held a vice-president’s position at Texas-based energy group TXU, with global responsibility for a number of government, regulator, stakeholder and media relationships. With her new role in Leeds Lurene is considered one of the most senior black female executives in the north of England.


Doreen Lawrence


Campaigner/Director of the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust


Doreen came to public attention in 1993 when her 18-year-old son, Stephen, was murdered in a racial attack at a bus stop. Her tireless fi ght for justice helped bring about a step change in Britain’s legal system when the 1999 publication of the Macpherson Report into her son’s murder heaped unprecedented criticism on an ‘institutionally racist’ police force. Her dignifi ed work has been inspirational for people worldwide. In 1998 she founded the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust to promote a positive community legacy. She has sat on panels for the Home Offi ce and for the Police Service, and she is also a member of the board of human rights organisation Liberty, as well as being a patron of the anti-hate crime charity Stop Hate UK. In 2003 Doreen, and Stephen’s father, Neville, were awarded the OBE for services to community relations. A key accomplishment of the trust named aſt er her son was the completion in 2007 of the fi rst purpose-built edifi ce ever commissioned by a BME charity, T e Stephen Lawrence Centre. In 2004 Doreen was listed on the 100 Great Black Britons website. She was among those chosen to carry the London Olympic Games torch through Deptford, south London, and was also selected to be one of the fl ag bearers in the Olympics opening ceremony.


52 POWERLIST 2013 | WWW.POWERFUL-MEDIA.COM


Simon Woolley


Director, Operation Black Vote/Commissioner for the Equality and Human Rights Commission


As a founder and director of Operation Black Vote Simon has helped grow a project from a mere idea into what is now a hugely infl uential national black organisation. OBV was launched in July 1996 to encourage greater ethnic minority involvement in the political process. In the fi rst 10 months of its founding OBV held more than 100 meetings at schools, colleges, community centres and town halls up and down the country. In December 2009 Simon became a commissioner for the Equality and Human Rights Commission, which many people credit with having beaten the British National Party and having persuaded many in the police that the racial profi ling of ‘stop and search’ would do more harm than good. In addition to his OBV and EHRC work Simon is a visiting lecturer at Nottingham University. He sits on two government task forces: REACH, which is focused on black boys’ higher educational attainment, and T e Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Women’s Councillors task force, which is aimed at encouraging BME women to become councillors. Simon appeared on the Big Issue Grassroots Power List 2002, was given the Men of Merit honour in 2003 and was awarded the community achievement in 2007 by Unison, Britain’s biggest trade union.


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