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T e Arts, Fashion & Design


Chris Ofi li Artist


He may be best known for the use of elephant dung in his works, which made headlines when he won the Turner Prize in 1998, but since then Chris has become one of the most inf luential contemporary British artists, even though he is now based in Trinidad, where he says he feels freer to pursue his career. His paintings often reference blaxploitation films and gangsta rap, seeking to question racial and sexual stereotypes in a humorous way. He draws on a wide range of other cultural references too, from the Bible to jazz, from Blake and Rodin to pornographic magazines. His signature elephant dung is never far away and is often incorporated into his work with lumps of it attached to the canvas directly or as a varnished support for paintings on public display. Aside from his own work, Chris founded the Freeness Project. This involved the coming together of artists, producers and musicians of minority ethnic groups (Asian and African) in an attempt to give exposure to music that doesn’t usually get it. Freeness allowed the creativity of unsigned contemporary British ethnic minority artists to be heard and resulted in an album, Freeness Volume 1, a compilation of works that were shown during the tour.


Elvira Dyangani Ose


Curator, International Art, Tate Modern Gallery


Michelle Ogundehin


Editor-in-Chief, Elle Decoration


As editor-in-chief of the world’s biggest homes interior magazine Michelle Ogundehin is in a key position to infl uence consumers and the vast design and home products market. She is internationally recognised as an authority on interiors, style and design. She was appointed a Trustee of the V&A Museum in 2008 and is also a director of MO:Studio Ltd, her own creative direction and interior design consultancy. Michelle was appointed editor-in-chief of ELLE Decoration UK in May 2004. In August 2007 she was appointed editor -in-chief of Real Homes magazine (a position she held in addition to her editorship of ELLE Decoration) masterminding its re-launch in January 2008 and subsequent sale a year later. Originally trained as an architect, she began her publishing career on the launch of Tate Art Magazine. She then moved to Blueprint magazine where she rose to the position of senior editor in less than three years. In April 2012 ELLE Decoration launched a campaign aimed at changing intellectual property rights laws in Britain where designers are currently aff orded less protection from copying than those from other creative disciplines, such as music, fi lm, books and art. In May 2012, the government announced a change in the law to refl ect the aims of the campaign.


Prof Andrew Ramroop


Proprietor, Maurice Sedwell


Elvira is a well-respected curator and scholar in the fi eld of African art. In 2011, she was appointed to curate the Nigerian Guaranty Trust Bank annual project for Tate Modern. Her role is to off er her expertise to the collection and Tate programmes, with the aim of increasing the presence and visibility of African art within the gallery. Born in Spain, it was there where she fi rmly established her reputation as a successful curator. She holds a Master’s degree in T eory and History of Architecture, from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya and a BA in Art History, from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. She completed her PhD in History of Art and Visual Studies at Cornell University, New York. T roughout her international career, she has developed numerous interdisciplinary projects, focusing on the politics of representation and the role of artists in history-making. She was the general curator of the Arte invisible programme – a multidisciplinary project showcasing artists, artist collectives, curators in 2009 and 2010. In 2012, she served as the curator for PICHA, a biennial of photography and video scheduled in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo. She was also a guest curator to the triennial SUD-Salon Urbain de Douala in 2010, and will again be among their curators for the 2013 edition.


16 POWERLIST 2013 | WWW.POWERFUL-MEDIA.COM


Andrew, recognised as perhaps the premier tailor on London’s world-famous Savile Row, came to England in 1970 after a nine- day boat trip from his native Trinidad. He was 17 and already an accomplished tailor, so he was soon working on Savile Row for the bespoke tailoring shop that he now owns. In 2011 he celebrated his 40th year on the ‘Row’ and throughout his notable career, has been showered with numerous awards; the Chaconia Gold Medal, Trinidad’s highest civilian honour, in 2005, and also the OBE in 2009 to name but a few. In 2010 Andrew was appointed chair of the Caribbean Academy of Fashion & Design. Andrew was the first tailor to be made a visiting professor of the London Institute. One of the best tailors in the world, he makes suits for the super wealthy, captains of industry, top financiers, celebrities such as Samuel L Jackson and even royalty – Princess Diana was a client. His suits start at about £4,000 and he has created the only signature style on Savile Row since Tommy Nutter. Four years ago, Andrew opened the Savile Row Academy, the only training facility on the Row, in a bid to keep up standards in the profession.


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