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Media, Publishing & Entertainment


Tamara Howe


Controller, Production Operations, BBC Vision Productions


Tamara is one of the most infl uential people at the BBC. In 2011 she was appointed the Controller of Vision Production Operations – the in-house division responsible for stand-out titles such as EastEnders, Luther, Frozen Planet, Miranda, T e One Show, Strictly Come Dancing and many more. She also plays a key role in establishing a pan-UK approach to network production as well as overseeing the content production. Tamara began her career in television over 25 years ago, cutting her teeth on the multicultural magazine programme T e Bandung File. Five years later she moved to London Weekend Television, where she spent a further 13 years in the commercial sector. During her time at LWT she moved through the ranks of production management and was a founding member of the Cultural Diversity Network, working closely with the other key broadcasters to improve representation both on and off screen. In 2003 she joined BBC Current Aff airs as head of Production & Finance and, in 2006, joined BBC Children’s as head of operations where she led on the move to Salford. T e daughter of TV presenter Darcus Howe, Tamara sits on the London Council for the Prince’s Trust.


Gary Lee


Executive Chef, Private Room and Private Members Club, T e Ivy


Gary’s career goes from strength to strength. Aſt er four years as head chef for T e Ivy he was promoted to executive chef in 2011. He is in charge of the restaurant and of the organisation’s private dining facilities and private members’ club. T e Ivy is one of the world’s most famous restaurants and a London institution that is regularly frequented by A-listers that include Elton John, Mick Jagger, Angelina Jolie, George Michael, and Tom Cruise. As a magnet for the glitterati there’s no other restaurant in the same league. Gary oversaw the launch of Ivy Dubai, to much critical acclaim. His career at Caprice, T e Ivy’s parent company, which owns some of London’s fi nest and best-loved restaurants, has included positions as sous chef at Le Caprice and head chef at Bam-Bou before he took up his role, in 2007, as head chef at T e Ivy. In addition, he does cookery demonstrations in schools and colleges and, in some cases, mentors college catering students. His most recent protégé was runner up in the Rotary ‘Young Chef of T e Year’ competition. Outside work Gary, who has three daughters, loves boxing. He trains up to four times a week and is a great fan of the discipline, concentration and tactical control that the sport requires.


40 POWERLIST 2013 | WWW.POWERFUL-MEDIA.COM


Kanya King MBE Founder/CEO, MOBO


With more than 250m people in 65 countries now watching the MOBOs (Music Of Black Origin awards) Kanya runs one of the world’s biggest black music events. If anything, the awards have become even more popular over the past few years as Kanya has moved them from their London base to various locations around Britain. T e success of the MOBOs led to Kanya being recognised in Real Business magazine’s list of Britain’s 100 Most Entrepreneurial Women. Before establishing the MOBOs (of which she is the sole owner) in 1996, she worked her way up from television researcher and a booker for Radio 2. She then remortgaged her home to fund a ceremony that gave due acknowledgement to African and Caribbean artists and black music. Kanya acts as a consultant on a number of government initiatives for disadvantaged youth and is a founder member of Net Women, an infl uential body of high-profi le women in the media. She recently joined the boards of the London Entrepreneurial Exchange and the National Skills Academy and was awarded an honorary doctorate in business at Leeds University. She has become a consultant to HSBC Group plc, a visiting professor at London Metropolitan Business University and a patron of music at City of Westminster College.


Donna McConnell Showbiz Editor, Mail Online


Donna McConnell is the showbiz editor for the hugely successful Daily Mail website and a journalist with over a decade’s experience in the industry. She is responsible for managing all the showbiz news for the popular website and overseeing the output of a team of 10 journalists based in the UK and the US. Her career in journalism came aſt er she enjoyed a stint in the music business as a rapper with group She Rockers. T e band released British hip-hop classics Give It A Rest and On Stage before disbanding in 1992. She returned to college as a mature student aged 25 to study for an access course in media, before gaining a place on the competitive media degree course at Westminster University. Her fi rst journalism job was online, as an editorial assistant on the Financial Times’ Ftyourmoney.com section. She also freelanced for newspapers including T e Sunday Mirror, T e Evening Standard, T e Times and T e Observer. She joined the Daily Mail in 2005, as a freelancer. She was later employed as a showbusiness journalist and further promoted to showbusiness editor. Donna has become a core member of the team responsible for turning around the website’s previously ailing fortunes. In 2012, Mail Online overtook the New York Times as the world’s most-read newspaper website with over 90m unique users visiting the website every month.


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