This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Politics, Law & Religion


Courtenay Griffiths, QC Barrister


Jamaica-born Courtenay Griffiths remains one of Britain’s most senior and respected criminal lawyers, noted for the many high-profile cases he’s undertaken. For example he was lead counsel representing Charles Taylor, the former president of Liberia, at The Hague in the Netherlands that hit the headlines in 2010 when Courtenay cross-examined supermodel Naomi Campbell. Taylor became the first African head of state to be charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity. In the UK, Courtenay’s skills were witnessed in the Damilola Taylor murder trial, the PC Keith Blakelock murder trial, the Brighton bombing and the Harrods bombing. Courtenay, who came to Britain in 1961 and was raised in Coventry, has become more involved with international criminal law and is seeking to concentrate on international cases relating to human rights. Courtenay has also written and lectured on all aspects of the criminal justice system. Courtenay has never shied away from making known his views on the need for a legal profession that ref lects better society as a whole. He has also been vocal about the necessity for a legal aid system that works for society’s most vulnerable people.


Reverend Rose Hudson-Wilkin


Chaplain to the House of Commons, Vicar of Westminster


In June 2010, Reverend Rose, who was born and raised in Jamaica, became the first black vicar of Westminster when she was appointed the Speaker’s Chaplain in the House of Commons. But her appointment by Speaker John Bercow was mired in controversy as the Dean of Westminster, who usually makes the appointment that is then ratified by the Speaker, had wanted to appoint someone else to the joint role of Chaplain and Rector of St Margaret’s. The resulting stalemate has meant that, for the first time in centuries, the job is split in two. Rev Rose maintains her role as vicar at All Saints Church in Haggerston, east London, and Holy Trinity Church in Dalston. There may be more controversy in the wings because she is also seen as a leading contender to become one of the first women bishops in the Anglican Church. In 2011, she won the Woman of the Year Award presented by the Keep the Faith magazine. In addition to her role, the reverend gives talks to young people throughout the country, often while working with the Robert Levy Foundation. She has also called upon the Church of England to apologise for its role in the trade of enslaved Africans.


48 POWERLIST 2013 | WWW.POWERFUL-MEDIA.COM


Kem Ihenacho Partner, Clifford Chance


Te personable Kem has been a partner at Clifford Chance, one of the UK’s leading law firms, for the past seven years. He specialises in private equity and corporate finance, advising a number of the world’s leading private equity funds on leveraged acquisitions and venture capital investments. He co-heads the firm’s Africa Group and heads its African private equity practice. Kem’s clients include some of the leading African businesses, such as the Nigeria-based Dangote Group of Alhaji Aliko Dangote, the wealthiest black man on the planet who is estimated to be worth £10bn. Kem is also on the board of International Lawyers for Africa, an initiative aimed at getting global law firms to contribute to the development of legal skills and expertise of African lawyers. Kem advises charities and not-for-profit organisations on legal matters on a pro bono basis. Kem is also a member of the Legal and Regulatory Council of the Emerging Markets Private Equity Association. He joined Clifford Chance in 1999 and was promoted to partner in 2007. Distinguished in his field, he is recognised by the legal directories Chambers and Which Lawyer? as a leading lawyer for private equity and M&A. More recently he was recognised as a New Generation Leader for Africa by the Africa Leadership Network.


Matthew Ryder, QC Barrister


London-born Matthew went to state schools before reading law at Cambridge and completing a Masters in international human rights at Columbia University, New York. He qualified at both the London and New York Bar. He is one of the UK’s top barristers specialising in criminal work, public law and human rights. He has been involved in many high-profile cases, such as representing Louis Farrakhan and the family of Stephen Lawrence, as well as several renowned terrorism trials. He was appointed a part-time Crown Court judge in 2009. Over the past year he represented the family of Ian Tomlinson, the newspaper seller who died in G20 protests in 2009, secured an appeal for the ex-chair of the Black Police Association Ali Dizaei, won appeals for 20 environmental protestors arising from the activity of undercover police, advised journalists on the phone- hacking scandal and represented the ex-chairman of the Kenyan opposition in the International Criminal Court in Te Hague. He was named the Times lawyer of the week in April 2011. Matthew was nominated one of 20 national role models for black boys and young men in 2009. He was the chair of the Black Cultural Archive from 2009-2012.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120