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Business, Finance & IT


Kola Karim


Group Chief Executive Officer, Shoreline Energy International


The extraordinarily well-connected Kola is the group CEO of Shoreline Energy, an energy and infrastructure group that has a portfolio of 16 operating companies, with an employee base of more than 3,000. He is chairman of Costain West Africa, one of the group’s companies. He serves as a director in seven of Shoreline’s subsidiary companies. In 2011, Kola was also made a director of Eco Bank (Nigeria) plc. In 2008, the World Economic Forum, a highly respected independent international organisation, selected him as a Young Global Leader, thereby joining the ranks of the select group of leading executives, public figures and intellectuals, all of whom were aged 40 or under. He is an active member of the Global Agenda Council on Emerging Multinationals and also a member of the Institute of Directors Nigeria, an affiliate of the Institute of Directors in the UK. Three of Kola’s brothers also hold senior roles within the company. Shoreline Energy operates in five big economies across Africa and has anticipated moving into four new countries by 2013. The firm acquired a 45% interest in a producing oil mining lease in Nigeria worth more than £500m.


Ric Lewis


Chief Executive and Chairman, Tristan Capital Partners


Ric is a London-based boutique investment manager specialising in real estate investment strategies. Tristan Capital runs three pan- European funds with about £3bn under management. Ric previously founded and served for several years as chief executive of Curzon, the London-based real estate investment company, and was chief investment officer and on the board of directors of AEW Europe, Curzon’s parent company. Ric’s drive positioned Curzon as a leader in the world of global property and it won awards for its returns. Ric is a Harvard Business School graduate. He is on several boards as a director, trustee or governor; these include London First, the Eastside Young Leaders Academy, Teach First, the King Solomon Academy and the International Inspiration Foundation. Ric created the Black Heart Foundation, a family charity that tries to provide better opportunities to underprivileged UK and US youths. He sits on the board of Grassroots Soccer, an HIV education charity. Outside of work commitments, Ric volunteers the majority of his time to organisations dedicated to improving the access to and the quality of education, especially for children from less advantaged areas and environments.


Piers Linney


Co-CEO, Outsourcery; Trustee, Powerlist Foundation


Bernard Mensah


Global Head of Emerging Markets, Bank of America Merrill Lynch


Piers is regarded as one of the UK’s cloud computing pioneers. Outsourcery, the company he and his business partners began in 2007, is a world-leading Cloud Services Provider. Te company’s stated aim is to remove the need for businesses to own and/or manage IT and communications infrastructure and applications. Outsourcery was named Business Solutions Provider of the Year at the 2011 Mobile News Awards and, in July, Piers was asked to meet Steve Ballmer, Microsoſt’s chief executive, at Microsoſt’s worldwide partner conference in Los Angeles. Outsourcery had already been awarded Microsoſt Gold Partner status, representing the highest level of competence and expertise with Microsoſt technologies, and had become Microsoſt’s number-one worldwide hosting partner. In May 2011, Piers featured on the Channel 4 television series Te Secret Millionaire – he spent 10 days in Wolverhampton, volunteering at Brinsford Young Offenders’ Institution. Piers, 40, who started Outsourcery in 2007, qualified as a solicitor but leſt law to pursue a career as an investment banker at Credit Suisse. In 2000 he leſt banking to pursue his internet business dreams. Now that they are realised, he sits on the governance board of the UK’s Cloud Industry Forum and became a trustee of the Powerlist Foundation in 2010.


32 POWERLIST 2013 | WWW.POWERFUL-MEDIA.COM


Tere are few African or African Caribbean people in investment banking as influential as Bernard Mensah, who is a genuine heavyweight in the industry. London-based Bernard is head of Emerging Markets, ex-Asia, Global Markets at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. He has more than 19 years of investing experience and joined Bank of America Merrill Lynch from Goldman Sachs, where he was a partner and global head of bank Loan and Distressed Trading. Prior to 2008, he spent time in Hong Kong and Tokyo running Goldman’s Asia credit and convertibles arm. Before joining Goldman in 2000, Bernard worked in emerging markets for Credit Suisse First Boston. In 2012, he was a key driver behind the Times CEO Summit on Business in Africa, attended by some of the world’s highest-profile business and political names, such as former Nigerian president Olusegun Obasanjo. In 2011 the inaugural event attracted two African heads of state – owing to Bernard’s personal relationship with them. Bernard has a healthy relationship with Prince Charles and was responsible in 2011 for an event hosted by the Prince at Clarence House to celebrate British West Africans. Bernard received a BA in social sciences at the University of Bristol in 1989. He is a qualified chartered accountant.


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