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Business, Finance & IT


Tevin Tobun


Founding Managing Director, Gate Ventures Transport & Facilities Group


Tevin founded Gate Ventures, a facilities services fi rm, in 2001. T e entrepreneur makes this list because of the example he sets as a young black man running a growing business and because of the eff orts he makes to give something back. His journey began when he was studying at university. In 1998 he established Tobman Enterprises, selling products purchased from wholesalers to independent retailers. It wasn’t long before he conceived of an idea about services that would be relevant to local authorities and landed on the solution of ‘one-stop shop’ facilities. Eleven years aſt er its birth in a southwest London boiler room, Gate now employs more than 300 full- and part- time staff . A US offi ce was launched in 2009. Among other things, his company was responsible for delivering more than one million school dinners in 2011 and incorporates building services such as maintenance, cleaning and recycling. Tevin is involved in other ventures, including a consultancy service for those seeking advice and support about the challenges of business. In November 2011, he was appointed the chair of Inspirational You, a charitable group that empowers students, future leaders and entrepreneurs. Also, Tevin runs regular business workshops.


Levi Roots


Chef, Founder of the ‘Reggae Reggae’ brand/Musician


Levi Roots is one of Britain’s most-loved entrepreneurs and his ‘Reggae Reggae’ sauce range has become a favourite. Born Keith Valentine Graham in Clarendon, Jamaica, the Brixtonian started as a musician before turning his hand to his culinary talents. T e humble beginnings of his jerk barbecue sauce (based on his grandmother’s recipe) started in 1991, where he would sell at the renowned Notting Hill Carnival. Sixteen years later, aſt er an investment from Dragon’s Den entrepreneurs, it would hit the shelves in Sainsbury’s and become a national hit. Since then, his rise has been phenomenal. Levi’s fi rst television show, Caribbean Food Made Easy, aired in 2009 on BBC2, with a book of the same name published in August 2009. Levi has since written six cookery books and has also partnered the popular fast-food chains Subway and KFC with his ‘Reggae Reggae’ products. In July 2009, Birds Eye released chicken Chargrills in ‘Reggae Reggae’ Sauce and in April 2011, Domino’s Pizza launched a limited edition ‘Reggae Reggae’ Pizza. His range is widely available in British supermarkets nationwide, accompanied by his delightful catchphrase ‘Put some music in your food’.


Trevor Williams


Chief Economist, Lloyds Bank Wholesale Banking & Markets


Over the past 12 months Trevor, who forewarned – to some criticism at the time – that there was a storm brewing around Greece and the euro, has been vindicated. All the so-called experts who criticised him were forced to eat humble pie as his predictions came true. His clients who acted upon his advice were the ones with smiles on their faces. Trevor leads the team that supports Lloyds Banking Group’s trading and sales activities and regularly appears on radio and television to off er his expert opinion on the fi scal and monetary issues of the day. He is a member of the Institute for Economic Aff airs’ Shadow Monetary Policy Committee – a group of independent, leading monetary economists. From June 2007, Trevor became one of the committee’s nine voting members, and one of only four City-based members, the remainder being professors and academics. Trevor joined Lloyds from the civil service, where he had worked as an economist. Before that he was a lecturer. He writes articles for various Lloyds publications and fi nancial trade journals, has a regular slot on Sky television’s Jeff Randall show and his team at Lloyds continues to win awards for its high-quality research. He is a visiting professor in banking and fi nance at Derby University.


34 POWERLIST 2013 | WWW.POWERFUL-MEDIA.COM


Pic: John Ferguson


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