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ALMA MATTERS EXTRAORDINARY ALUM


Dr. Wayne Duehn, PhD W


ayne Duehn, PhD, grew up in rural Minnesota. He earned


his BA at North Central College in Naperville, his MSW at Loyola, and his PhD at Washington University in St. Louis, and then moved to The University of Texas at Arlington, where he has been a faculty member since 1970, specializing in human sexuality and sexual abuse.


MAN WITH A PLAN • I was always interested in social work. I chose Loyola because it had the best clini- cal program in the Chicago area. I knew I was always going to work with people, and service to the community was important to me.


ON THE RIGHT FOOT • I had the best foundation at Loyola. Our class had wonderful camaraderie, and the faculty was supportive. My first casework class in clinical practice was with Fr. Biestek [the late Felix P. Beistek, S.J., a Loyola professor for over 30 years]. He was nationally known, and I couldn’t have had a better way to get into the field.


WITNESSING A REVOLUTION • I entered into my specific field com- pletely by accident. In my studies in St. Louis, I had the opportunity to be a research associate at the Mas- ters and Johnson Institute—they were really the first sex researchers in the nation. It was a topic of con- versation around the country. Even social work itself was an emerging field—my PhD in social work from Washington University was the first one they ever awarded.


Wayne Duehn (MSW ‘64), PhD, a leading figure in social work and social work education


DOUBLE DUTY • When I came to Texas, I began to teach one of the first social work courses on human sexuality, and, in my practice, I began seeing both victims and offenders of sexual abuse. Social work is a profession—it’s not just about gaining knowledge; it’s about doing. I’ve been really involved in clinical practice, and that has enhanced my teaching. It actually made teaching easier, because I could bring real examples into the classroom to demonstrate the theoretical principles.


PIONEERING SPIRIT • I’m proud to have advanced the field of child protective services, providing knowledge about the dynamics of abuse, neglect, and prevention.


I believe I was a frontrunner in trauma-informed practice, which means dealing with the aftermath of traumatic experience.


THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE • Sexuality in general has been a taboo subject, and, for years, sexual abuse was not spoken about. I’ve seen an increase in community awareness, and through advocacy, caregivers are now more able to recognize signs and symptoms. The stigma of reporting abuse and ne- glect is not as great as it once was, and our clinical skills have evolved.


ALTERNATE REALITY • If I had to go back and choose another path, I would want to be a lawyer—an advocate for children.


LIFE THESE DAYS • I’m still ac- tively consulting and doing training throughout the country. I’m out on the road once a week. I do have more time to spend with my grand- daughter, work in my backyard, and play with my Great Dane, Bismarck.


BISMARCK, YOU SAY? • My “down” command to my dog is, “sink,” and he hits the floor and lies very still. The only thing he can’t control is his tail.


FAMILY LIFE • I met my wife, Barbara, at North Central. We’re celebrating our 50th wedding an- niversary this year. I have a daughter in telecommunications and a grand- daughter who’s a pistol, and I’m trying to spoil her rotten.


MSW ‘64 • Professor Emeritus, Social Work, The University of Texas at Arlington


42 LOYOLA UNIVERSIT Y CHICAGO


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