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Ticketing & Capacity Management – Part 1


Leveraging the power of digital


Matthew Hoenstine


Matthew Hoenstine, principal - destinations and Randy Josselyn, principal - wildlife and conservation, tell Park World why capacity management and timed ticketing is likely the new normal for your attraction.


F Randy Josselyn


or over 30 years, Gateway Ticketing Systems has worked with the world’s top theme parks, zoos, aquariums, museums and other attractions all over


the world. These locations have trusted Galaxy software for ticketing, admission control, group sales, membership/ season pass and CRM solutions to drive revenue and increase efficiencies throughout their attraction by having a unified solution. Matthew and Randy have past experience as operators, at Universal and Disney respectively – experience they have been bringing to the table each week as part of the company’s Webinar Wednesday series, which has also seen a whole host of operators share their thoughts on this subject and a range of others. “In our webinars we often have surveys where we ask


the audience, what is it that you’re concerned about?” says Randy, explaining that ticketing and access management is a recurring theme. They are asking, “how do I metre in the number of guests I’m going to get and they are thinking about it from a couple of different vantage points. One is


JUNE 2020


‘I’ve got a main entrance where I have to process these folks and I don’t want that to become overwhelmed. If that starts to pile up then the first impression my guests have is that this is not a safe place, there’s tons and tons of people just standing here to get in, I need to go back to the car and leave’. So, one, first impressions are critical – how do we make sure we give the right first impression when the person gets to the main entrance and two, when they are in the park they also have that great experience where they are able to be physically distanced from other parties, but still enjoy the amazing attractions that we have.” What’s required says Randy has two elements: how we


manage the park and also capacity manage those arrivals. “I think one of the surprising things that we had found is that in some attractions they were giving blocks of time which is interesting as historically, parks have always said consumers don’t want to pre-plan, its spur of the moment, they want flexibility while on vacation, but in reality they


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