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HOLD GAMING


above-board operator; we behave as though we are a highly-regulated operator or supplier. Gaining trust, as opposed to doing it and asking for forgiveness later, is going to be what gets us accepted in these territories.


The tools that are for anti-money-laundering (AML) and know your customer (KYC) also keep young kids out and prevent people overspending. We’re going to operate well within the construct of local laws and legislation, then hopefully we will be able to lobby for platforms like ours that take the responsible approach to gaming. It’s not like an online casino where you can dump in $10k a day, it’s competitive between two players. Nobody is being ripped off and nothing sketchy is going on, so we continue to work to earn trust from players and governing bodies, and we will hopefully use our successes to expand into other countries with our full suite of features.


GIO: The future of iGaming should be pretty interesting; what are your thoughts? PR: Once the insanity around sportsbook dies down, through initialising online sportsbook in the US as more states clamour to get this, we will ride on those coat-tails. iGaming will begin to become more prevalent, people will see we are not creating degenerates through online sportsbooks, it can all be done responsibly…


It’s a process of expanding our user base so as states come online, any operator or content provider can say hey, you’ve already got 5m people in California playing your games, can we partner with you now that iGaming is available there? Or any other state we operate in, of course.


GIO: You’ve found a niche online there. With skill gaming only recognised in casinos for the last couple of years, and everyone wondering how to


make money in e-gaming – you’ve found the barren ground between the two and planted a tree. How do you grow from here? PR: I don’t think we will be the only company in here for long. I’m glad you brought up the skill games on casino floors though. If we can call a spade a spade, these are really glorified slot machines; they work off random number generators, they’re just painted up a little differently to make the player feel there is a chance now because there is a slight element of skill. Ultimately, they are still looking at the money in-money out aspect. Because we are self-distributing and building our own content, we are tackling all of the legal hurdles. As far as start-ups go we are probably the most under-funded startup in the history of ideas, and we are trying to take it to market on our own without any heavy hitters backing us. We need to focus first on refining product and gameplay, which will also help bring new users in; from there it is expanding the countries in which we can operate. We work in highly regulated gaming markets but there is a massive appetite there. The social casino games numbers prove it time and again. Finally, it is expanding our content offering – we do have another very well-known card game lined up of equal stature, as popular as blackjack, on the way. I think we will do these as one-off apps, but our platform does allow us to port our content anywhere we want; because of our proprietary content and the way it is developed, it’s not a Unity build so it can go in any browser, native device, so we can look to build an entourage of games and from there, we can make our platform available to content producers. We have the tools to support their social play, their skill-based play, we have the legal resources they need, we can get the payments providers for them… That’s the big picture here right now.


106 FEBRUARY 2020 GIO


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