search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
HOLD GAMING


HOLD TIGHT


Hold Gaming is ploughing its own furrow in the world of iGaming. Founder and CEO Phillip Runyan talks to GIO about the company and its mission.


I


My experience in social media has given me a little bit of an edge here on how to find the right players


t’s not that common to find a company in a field of one, but Hold Gaming might be exactly that. Blackjack Fire is their first offering, and CEO Phillip Runyan believes his background with DoubleDown Interactive in the social gaming space has put him in the ideal position to create something genuinely new and exciting. Phillip spoke with GIO about the company…


GIO: What is Hold Gaming? Phillip Runyan: Fundamentally we are the DraftKings of iGaming, to put it in its most basic form. What we are doing is creating iGaming content, amending the play style so that it meets the stringent requirements of being a skill-based game, then distributing that content on our platform in upwards of 40 US states and Australia.


We are a skill-based gaming company; casino e-sports is a term we have coined because we are a competitive casino gaming company. There has been a long history of trying to make games fit iGaming, to make them fit within the realm of legislation that works in the US or internationally. To try and duck some rules and regulations, create grey spaces – that’s not really what we are trying to do here. We want people to play games that they know and love.


GIO: And you happen to have such games? PR: In the first instance that might be Blackjack Fire. The core construct of the game is how you would play blackjack but instead of playing the house you play a timed round where you and your competitor have the exact same starting balance, same minimum and maximum at the table which you can wager; each hand won gives you points on the leaderboard, both players have three minutes to play, and both players have identical decks. That means that if you and I both have the same bankroll management strategy we can both count cards the exact same way! But it really means that our fundamental understanding of the rules of blackjack, the ability to process math and probability faster than the other person becomes the true identifying skill leveraged here. If I can get through my deck 1% faster than you, I can create 1% more opportunities, more cards, from that deck, so more chances to put points on the board and beat you.


GIO: Your background was with DoubleDown Interactive, wasn’t it? PR: Yes. We went from a live launch to acquisition by IGT in 18 months. My role there was to drive marketing and for a while I was a one-man team handling user acquisition, retention marketing, email,


104 FEBRUARY 2020 GIO


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126