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him to do it – a stand for the Coronation Festival in the gardens of Buckingham Palace. It was a nice thing to start on to see if there was a good fit between us.


What qualities do you look for when commissioning designers? We enjoy collaborations where we can form long-term relationships, and where the company becomes part of our extended team, as is the case with Mowat & Company. It goes far beyond a simple client-consultant relationship. We’re always looking for potential collaborators who think the way we do. We wanted someone like Alex who would


challenge us as well – you need to have a positive creative tension.


What projects have you collaborated on with Mowat & Company?


Geordie D’Anyers Willis is creative director of wine merchants Berry Bros & Rudd


After the exhibition stand, they designed a warehouse shop for us in Basingstoke. Alex was very good at being respectful of budgets, which is very useful in an architect. We were able to create something with a very positive impact as a retail space, and because it was so far away from our base in St James’s in the centre of London, we could be a little braver in our approach. Ten we collaborated on 63 Pall Mall, our first new shop in many years. Tere we had the challenge of creating something


‘We’re


interested in projects that are designed to wear in rather than wear out. We want things to last, as we are always thinking about handing the company down the generations’


ABOVE AND OPPOSITE PAGE: CHRIS HORWOOD RIGHT: ELENA HEATHERWICK


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