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DESIGN FOR RESILIENCE 091


London, designed with particular sensitivity for families. Commissioned by Bedu, the design prioritises the well-being of children while reinforcing links within and beyond the community (see case study, previous page). Te practice, along with John McAslan & Partners has been involved in a major research project for RIBA to identify the key challenges in the provision of homeless housing. Morris + Company associate Polina Pencheva says, ‘Homelessness shouldn’t be hidden and shouldn’t be stigmatised. Tere should be integration with the wider community. We are talking to a lot of charities and the Greater London Authority about how such projects can be made viable. Tere is no incentive to build anything like this because it’s not financially profitable.’


Trough extensive user engagement, key issues for design have emerged. ‘When people are displaced,’ Pencheva continues, ‘what you want is to feel normal again and not be put into very specific accommodation that looks like a homeless shelter and is stigmatised. But there is no guidance as to what such accommodation should be, which is dangerous because there are a lot of people who would use permitted development to turn any old buildings into very inappropriate accommodation. Everyone should have a right to windows, good levels of daylight, a communal space, and there should be support within the accommodation because you are dealing with vulnerable people.’ Te RIBA research project, titled ‘Emergency Homes for Young People,’ was published in November 2020.


FOCUS ON FOOD


Client Joint venture between LEAP Federation and Chefs In Schools


Architect Surman Weston Site area 298m2 Kitchen/indoor area 59m2


Cost £309,000 Completed Summer 2020


Structural engineer Structure Workshop


house


Services Engineer Peter Deer and Associates Planting design Lidia D’Agostino


Hackney School of Food is a joint venture, supported by the Council, between an enlightened trio of Hackney primary schools, via their Learning, Education, Arts and Partnership (LEAP) Federation, and the charity Chefs In Schools (see case study opposite). And it stands to reason that there will be a far greater role for charities and social enterprises – those organisations with a stated aim to improve the lot of society’s least privileged – in the post-lockdown landscape. This is a necessary shift, which the global pandemic has only made more urgent and visible, towards prioritising the well-being of humans and the wider ecology over monetary gain – something even the wider business world has acknowledged needs to happen. Forbes, a magazine for the world’s corporate elite, declared recently that social enterprise was ‘a new paradigm for business’, urging its readers to recognise that the more traditional models of business – profit at any cost – are changing. The yardstick by which it measured those shifts was the 2019 Deloitte Human Capital report, which declared that the situation had become even more acute, and that ’organisations must move beyond mission statements and philanthropy to learn to lead the social enterprise – and reinvent themselves around a human focus’. If that was true in 2019, it is even more so in 2021.


ALL IMAGES: JIM STEPHENSON


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