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community connection. What Holst has created is something far more engaging, both visually and programmatically. Comprising four buildings, each accommodating 24 residents, the project is arranged around a shared courtyard on a formerly industrial site donated by the local authority. Cheerful, semi-translucent multicoloured facades made of greenhouse polycarbonate reveal interior staircases as a way of animating and


illuminating the building from outside, but also providing an attractive, social circulation point, which can be left un-insulated. Outdoor space on this 700,000ft2


site offers further


generous provision for outdoor community activities, and land has been allocated within this for a productive food garden and dog run. One larger building offers 35 single rooms and, at its base, a large community room with laundry and gathering facilities as well as an ofice


for support staff. The three smaller buildings are based on a co-housing format, each featuring two six-bedroom units with two shared bathrooms and a shared kitchen. Due to its use of prefabricated parts, the building cost was reduced by an estimated 31% on a typical affordable build, and the whole scheme took only 10 months to complete. Some units rent out for as little as $300 a month. ‘Everybody has a bedroom with a locking door,’ said


Holst partner Dave Otte, ‘but they’re sharing a kitchen and they’re sharing their lives with one another.’


Client Transition Projects Architect Holst Architecture Building area 24,000ft2 Site area 70,790ft2 Completed March 2020


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